Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - July - 2019 Issue

Raptis Rare Books Offers Items "For the Collection of a Lifetime"

Dd966956-7801-4cb2-96d1-1c0740f0b41e

Books for the Collection of a Lifetime.

Raptis Rare Books has issued a new untitled catalogue "for the Collection of a Lifetime." Raptis does provide a table of contents to tell us what they have. Here it is: Cornerstones of Antiquity, Americana, History & World Leaders, Scientific Discovery & Exploration, Literature, Children's Literature, Sport & Leisure, Fine Art, and Economic & Social Policy. These are a few specific entries from this catalogue.

 

We will be hearing a lot in the days ahead about whether particular presidential candidates are "progressives." Here is the one about whom there is no doubt. He coined the term. We can only hope there is another Theodore Roosevelt out there somewhere. This is Roosevelt's most popular book, an account of his time in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Roosevelt had an enormous sense of duty and adventure, and when war broke out, he and Col. Leonard Wood founded a volunteer cavalry nicknamed The Rough Riders, also the title of this book. It consisted mainly of cowboys, ranchers, outdoorsmen and athletes from the American Southwest. The nickname came from the long title of Buffalo Bill's western show, "Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World." Published in 1899, this book did much to enhance Roosevelt's already growing reputation. That was also the year that Vice-President Garret Hobart died. When President McKinley sought reelection the following year, New York's Republican party boss wanted the reforming Governor out of New York and engineered his nomination as Vice-President. When McKinley was assassinated the following year, Roosevelt became President. This copy of The Rough Riders has been boldly signed by Roosevelt. Item 90180. Priced at $9,800.

 

This was the sixth Oz book and intended to be the last. That is ironic as creator L. Frank Baum would go on to write 14 of them before his untimely death in 1919, and publisher approved successors would continue writing for many more years to come. Eventually, there would be 40 books in the "canon" of Oz titles accepted by Oz collectors as canonical. The title is The Emerald City of Oz, and it was published in 1910. In the story, Dorothy is back in Kansas with Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, but they are in deep financial trouble. The tornado that destroyed their house in the first Oz book required Uncle Henry to take out a large loan. However, they are running out of funds to make their payments and the bank is threatening to foreclose on the farm. Em and Henry are most concerned with what will become of their niece, as they are her only family. While neither ever thought of Dorothy's Oz stories as anything more than imagination, she concludes that she must save them, and that can only be done by whisking them off to the land of Oz. That she arranges, and after a battle with with a wicked king who sought to overtake the land, they end up in the Emerald City, a Utopian place where all can live happily ever after. If only it were so. Unfortunately, Em and Henry weren't the only ones experiencing extreme financial difficulties. So was Baum himself. He had invested in plays and films based on Oz but these had not been as successful as his books. Like Em and Henry, he had, so to speak, bet the farm on them. The result was that Baum had to continue writing Oz books the remainder of his life, and the series was so popular the publisher turned to other writers to continue it. This copy is inscribed to "Martha Kneedler, Having been presented by her own true lover L. Frank Baum August 1910." This is obviously a joke as Martha, daughter of Baum's close friend William Kneedler, who was President Taft's personal physician, was only 16 years old at the time. Perhaps if "Alice in Wonderland" author Lewis Carroll had written this it would raise a few eyebrows, but Baum gets a pass on his joke. Item 96123. $17,500.

 

Here is one of those books that could be called prescient. The title is The Coming of Post-Industrial Society: A Venture in Social Forecasting, by Daniel Bell. It was published in 1973. Bell predicted that the economy would shift from being dominated by manufacturing firms to those providing services. He foresaw success would depend on information, people using data, knowledge and intelligence to advance their businesses or their careers. Education would be the paramount determinant of success. Assembly line and other manufacturing jobs would wither. This is all in 1973. Not only was there no internet or smart phones pushing out reams of data at us every second, people didn't even have personal computers back then. We look at our most valuable businesses today, Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook - they provide services and information. The top five companies in 1973 included all of the "Big 3" auto companies. Bell saw where the world was going long before very many others, except, perhaps, those who read his book. Better late than never. This copy was inscribed by Bell on July 12, 1973. Item 18062. $2,500.

 

This is a rather amazing piece of Americana. I don't know whether to call it a textual document or a portrait. What it is officially is a typographic portrait. That is when letters on a document are lighter or denser, sort of like the dots on a halftone, to create an image. In this case, the image they create is a portrait of Abraham Lincoln. However, these are not just any letters that are used. As the heading over the oval portrait explains, Proclamation of Emancipation. This is a typographic portrait using the Emancipation Proclamation as text. It was designed and written by W. H. Pratt and published in 1865. Obviously, he must have admired the late President. Item 95831. $6,000.

 

Here is another work of art with several Presidents and other notable American portraits, though it is not a typical art book. Rather, this is an 1875 issue of the United States Treasury Department Vignette and Portrait Presentation Album. Along with portraits of notables such as Washington, Lincoln, Grant and Franklin, there are soaring patriotic images. Soaring quite literally, since the eagle is a common American symbol. Raptis notes that these are "some of the finest examples of 19th century American engravings." When you think about it, that is not surprising. These were used on banknotes, and the engravings had to be intricate engravings to make counterfeiting difficult. Item 96257. $8,800.

 

Raptis Rare Books may be reached at 561-508-3479 or mail@raptisrarebooks.com. Their website is found at www.raptisrarebooks.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Jane Austen, <i>Sense and Sensibility: A Novel, By a Lady,</i> 3 volumes, London, 1811. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Virginia Woolf, <i>Kew Gardens,</i> limited edition, signed by Woolf & Bell, London, 1927. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> <i>[Arabian Nights],</i> Calcutta II version, 4 volumes, Calcutta & London, 1839-1842. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Princess Diana, 6 ALS to <i>Harper’s Bazaar</i> editor, anticipating Christie’s sale of her dresses for charity, 1995-97. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Jane Austen, <i>Emma,</i> first edition, London, 1816. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Hirohito & Nagako, Emperor & Empress of Japan, 2 photographs signed, showing Nagako in kimono & obi bearing the imperial seal. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Princess Diana, 6 autograph letters signed to <i>Harper’s Bazaar</i> editor Elizabeth Tilberis, anticipating Christie’s announcement of a sale of her dresses for charity, 1995-97. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Sarojini Naidu, complete galley proof of <i>The Broken Wing</i> signed with several holograph pages & an autograph letter signed to writer Edmund Gosse, 1916. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Fernando Pessoa, <i>Mensagem,</i> first edition, presentation copy, signed & inscribed, Lisbon, 1934. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Graham Greene, <i>The Basement Room,</i> first edition, Greene’s personal copy, signed with annotations throughout, London, 1935. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b> Abraham Lincoln, partly-printed document signed, call for troops issued during America’s first national draft just days before the NYC draft riots, 1863. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Feb 20:</b><br><i>Les Chansons de Bilitis</i> by Pierre Louÿs, illustrated by George Barbier & F.L. Schmied, Paris, 1922. $8,000 to $12,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Helvelius. Two Autograph Letters Signed to Francis Aston, Royal Society Secretary, noting his feud with Robert Hooke, 5 pp total, 1685. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Newton, Isaac. Autograph manuscript on God, 4 pp, c.1710, "In the beginning was the Word...."?$100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. First edition, first issue. Untrimmed copy in contemporary boards. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Lincoln, Abraham. Signed photograph, beardless portrait with Civil War provenance. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> IMPEACHMENT. Original engrossed copy of the first Andrew Johnson impeachment resolution vote. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Mucha, Alphonse. 11 original pencil drawings for?<i>Andelicek z Baroku,</i> "Litte Baroque Angel," Prague, 1929. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Einstein, Albert. Annotated Galley Proofs for <i>The Meaning of Relativity.</i> 1921. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Silverstein, Shel. Original maquette for <i>The Giving Tree,</i> 34 original drawings. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Roth, Philip. Typed Manuscript with substantial autograph corrections for an unpublished sequel to <i>The Breast.</i> $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> Taupin, Bernie. Autograph Manuscript, the original draft of lyrics for Elton John's "Candle in the Wind," 2 pp, 1973. $100,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> HARVEY, WILLIAM. <i>De Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus Anatomica Exercitatio.</i> Padua: 1643. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Mar. 6:</b> CESALPINO, ANDREA. <i>Peripateticarum Quaestionum Libri Quinque.</i> Venice: 1571. $30,000 to $40,000.
  • <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Leon TOLSTOÏ. <i>Anna Karenina.</i> Moscou, 1878. First and full edition of the Russian novel, in the author’s language.<br>Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Mark TWAIN. <i>Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade).</i> New York, 1885. First American edition.<br>Est. 5 000 / 6 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Walt WHITMAN. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York, 1856. Second edition gathering 32 poems. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Karen BLIXEN. <i>Out of Africa.</i> Londres, 1937. First edition in the UK, before Danish translation and American release.<br>Est. 1 500 / 2 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Ernest HEMINGWAY. <i>A Farewell to Arms.</i> New York, 1929. First edition with $2.50 on the dust and A on the copyright page.<br>Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Ulysses.</i> Paris, Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition published by Sylvia Beach. Est. 3 000 / 4 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> James JOYCE. <i>Dubliners.</i> Londres, 1914. First edition. Nice copy in publisher’s cardboard. Est. 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> Franz KAFKA. 8 novels in German first edition, published in München, Leipzig and Berlin 1916-1931. Est. from 300 / 400 to 2 000 / 3 000 €
    <b>ALDE, Feb. 26:</b> David Herbert LAWRENCE. <i>Lady Chatterley's Lover.</i> Florence, 1928. Privately printed first edition. Est. 4 000 / 5 000 €
    John STEINBECK. <i>The Grapes of Wrath.</i> New York, 1939. First edition. Nice copy with $2.75 on the cover. Est. 1 000 / 1 200 €
  • <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Harriet Tubman Cabinet Card by H.S. Squyer, Auburn, NY, 1892. $10,000 to $15,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Scarce <i>Events of the Tulsa Disaster,</i> First Edition, 1922. $4,000 to $6,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Unpublished CDV of Frederick Douglass by Benjamin F. Smith, 1864. $3,000 to $5,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> California Imprint of <i>President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation</i> Broadside, 1864. $10,000 to $15,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> John C.H. Grabill Cabinet Card of Buffalo Soldier Wearing Buffalo Coat, ca 1886. $8,000 to $10,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Rare <i>What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking,</i> 2nd Cookbook Published by African American. $6,000 to $8,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Frederick Douglass Walking Stick, 1888. $3,000 to $5,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Only Known Slave Narrative Published Independently in California, <i>Life and Adventures of James Williams.</i> $2,000 to $4,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Rare First Edition of History of Black Literature, Abbé Grégoire <i>De La Littérature des Nègres</i>. $2,500 to $3,000
    <center><b>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana<br>February 20, 2020</b>
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> African American Soldier and Medal of Honor Winner Christian A. Fleetwood CDV, PLUS. $8,000 to $10,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Jack Johnson vs. Jim Jeffries Pennant, 1910 Reno, Nevada. $2,000 to $4,000
    <br>Cowan’s, Feb. 20:</b> Joe Gans Photograph at 1906 Goldfield, Nevada Fight by Percy Dana. $600 to $800

Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions