• <b>Christie’s London, Nov. 27:</b> [Peter I, Tsar]. <i>Simboly i emblemata ukazom i blagopovedenii imperatora Petra Alekseevicha [Symbola et emblemata jussu atque auspiciis Petri Alexeidis].</i> Amsterdam, 1705. £30,000 to £40,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Nov. 27:</b> Charlemagne, Adolf. Benefice d'Adieu de Madame Naptal. [St Petersburg: 16th February 1873]. £30,000 to £40,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Nov. 27:</b> [Military. Album.] [An album of drawings of weapons and their accessories, drawn from nature by the Second Cadets Corps.] St Petersburg, 1800. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Nov. 27:</b> Pushkin, Alexander. <i>Evgenii Onegin.</i> St Petersburg: Dep. of Public Education, 1825-1832. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Christie’s London, Nov. 27:</b> Sumarokov, Pavel. <i>Dosugi krymskogo sud’i ili vtoroe puteshestvie v Tavridu. [The Leisure of a Crimean Judge or a Second Tour to Tauris].</i> St Petersburg: Imperial Press, 1803-5. £50,000 to £80,000
  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Macbeth: A Tragedy.</i> London, 1673. FIRST SEPARATE AND FIRST QUARTO EDITION. THE CHARLTON HESTON COPY. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> HEMINGWAY, ERNEST. <i>In Our Time.</i> Paris, 1924. FIRST EDITION, PRESENTATION COPY. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL. <i>Fanshawe, A Tale.</i> Boston, 1828. FIRST EDITION OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. <i>Walden; Or, Life in the Woods.</i> Boston, 1854. FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies.</i> London, 1685. THE FOURTH FOLIO, Brewster/Bentley issue. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> STEIG, WILLIAM. Original maquette and 58 finished drawings for <i>The Agony in the Kindergarten,</i> one of Steig's most important books. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> VERNE, JULES. <i>A Journey to the Centre of the Earth.</i> New York & London, 1872. FIRST EDITION, RARE AMERICAN ISSUE, with Scribner & Welford cancel title. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 5:</b> KING, STEPHEN. <i>Carrie.</i> New York, 1974. INSCRIBED FIRST EDITION, OF AUTHOR'S FIRST BOOK. $1,200 to $1,800.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> APPLE MACINTOSH PROTOTYPE. 1983. The earliest known Macintosh with "Twiggy" drive, one of only two known working machines. $120,000 to $180,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> PLATO. <i>Timaeus</i> [AND] <i>Critias</i> [from Ficini's 1484 Opera]. A LANDMARK OF SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> LOVELACE, AUGUSTA ADA. Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage Esq. London, 1843. FIRST EDITION, JOURNAL ISSUE, MOST IMPORTANT PAPER IN EARLY DIGITAL COMPUTING. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> APPLE-1 COMPUTER. Signed by Steve Wozniak, used in development of Apple II. $200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 4:</b> DARWIN, CHARLES. 1809-1882. <i>On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection.</i> London, 1859. FIRST EDITION. $80,000 to $120,000.
  • <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 25th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b> Fust-Schöffer-Bibel from Gutenberg-Press, 1462. Est: € 1,000,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>J. W. Weinmann, <i>Phytanthoza-Iconographia,</i> 1735-45. Est: € 60,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>O. Kokoschka, <i>Die träumenden Knaben,</i> 1917. Est: € 10,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 25th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>Z. Lilius, <i>Orbis breviarium,</i> 1493. <br>Est: € 10,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b> <i>Gazette du Bon Ton,</i> 1912-22.<br>Est: € 14,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>M. Chagall, <i>Daphnis & Chloé,</i> 1961. Est: € 100,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 25th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>C. Ptolemaeus, <i>Geographie,</i> 1513.<br>Est: € 100,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>E. L. Kirchner, <i>Umbra vitae,</i> 1924.<br>Est: € 6,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>J. Miró, <i>Midi le trèfle blanc,</i> 1968. Est: € 2,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 25th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b> Clemens V., <i>Constitutiones,</i> 1471.<br>Est: € 14,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>C. Gesner, <i>Tierbuch, Vogelbuch, Fischbuch,</i> 1563-81. Est: € 5,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, November 25:</b><br>J. Itten, <i>Utopia,</i> 1921. Est: € 2,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - April - 2019 Issue

Important American Historical Autographs from Joe Rubinfine

650ed524-c026-40b9-8e98-e621b1ba1959

American Historical Autographs.

Joe Rubinfine has issued his List 182 of American Historical Autographs. This is an outstanding collection of signed material from some of the best-known and most important names in American history. There are numerous presidential signatures, from Presidents great and not. They range from Washington to Millard Fillmore, Lincoln to William Henry Harrison. The largest group of names with which you (like me) may not be familiar are still very important to American history. There is a wide selection of signers of the Declaration of Independence, those who, unlike John Hancock, did not write their names so large and boldly as to be indelibly embedded in our memory. However, Hancock is here too. Here are a few selections from this exceptional catalogue.

 

Speaking of Lincoln, here are three poignant letters from Lincoln. No, not that Lincoln. These are from Mrs. Lincoln. Written several years after her husband's assassination, we find life is not easy for Mary Lincoln. It never was for her, even before her husband was killed. They were written to Mrs. Sally Orne, a Lincoln friend from their White House days and a wealthy Philadelphian. Mrs. Lincoln is suffering from a swollen and very painful first finger, now wrapped in cloths, "all arising from the smallest prick of a needle." She can scarcely sleep at night. She also says she is feeling "very anxious" for another Mary Lincoln, her son Robert's wife. However, mother-in-law jokes notwithstanding, Mary Lincoln is very fond of Mary Lincoln, if you will. "[M]y son is so greatly blessed in so sweet a young wife," writes the former First Lady. In her second letter, Mrs. Lincoln writes that she has bruised the thumb on her other hand, making it even more difficult to write. She says that "I have unfortunately fallen upon 'evil times.'" She does add that "Taddie is so grateful to be so kindly remembered by you all & sends his most respectful regards." In the third letter she expresses concern that an attempt to get her a pension will never be approved in Congress. She lists several proponents, including Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, whom she fears will be distracted from her situation, but he turned out to be the one who successfully obtained her pension. This time, she does have some good news. The other Mary Lincoln has just had a baby, this Mary's first grandchild. She thinks "Mary" a logical name for the granddaughter, though it might be confusing to have yet another Mary in the family. They did so name her, but she was called "Mamie." As for "Taddie," he was Tad Lincoln, the youngest of her children. The middle two of the four Lincoln children had already died at the ages of 4 and 12, and the tragedies would only continue to mount two years later when Tad also died, age 18. Mary Lincoln's was a tragic life. Item 26. Priced at $25,000.

 

One great President deserves...another? It would be unfair to say William Henry Harrison was a bad President. The only way to grade Harrison is with an incomplete. Harrison was the President who delivered a long-winded inauguration speech, the longest ever, in the cold rain, got sick, and died only a month into his term. One can only wonder what kind of a President he would have been. Here is a letter he wrote three years earlier to recently elected New York Congressman Gulian C. Verplanck on November 20, 1837. Harrison's opening line is filled with irony, considering his downfall shortly after his inauguration - "Your letter...found me suffering a severe inflammatory rheumatism in the knees from having foolishly exposed myself to the rain when under the operation of medicine for a previous cold." Foolishly exposed himself to the rain? Didn't this man learn anything from this experience? Harrison goes on to congratulate Verplanck on his unexpected election and mentions a connection to help Verplanck's brother in Colombia, but says he really can't delve into deeper connections now because "both my mind and body are in a situation very unfavourable to do any thing." The body concern is the "highly inflamed knee which is exceedingly painful," but worse, the mental issue is "the situation of a beloved son whom an uncurable disease is hanging to his person." That was almost certainly William Henry Harrison, Jr., who died the following year at age 35. Senior also writes that fortunately he has another son only five miles away to write for him. That son may have been John Scott Harrison, a future congressman and father of the then four-year-old future President Benjamin Harrison. Item 37. $8,500.

 

Next we have a rarity, thanks to the aforementioned President Harrison staying out in the rain too long and lasting only a month in office. It is a letter from Harrison's successor and "accidental President," John Tyler. Tyler does not get a grade of "incomplete." He was a terrible President. Item 38 is a letter of recommendation for an unnamed post to an unspecified correspondent. At least we know who he was recommending, an R. N. Crittenden of Virginia. What makes this March 19, 1841 letter rare is that it was written while Tyler was Vice-President. Just as Harrison was President for only 30 days, Tyler was Vice-President for only 30 days. $3,750.

 

This is a letter from Thomas Jefferson, itself unique, though unfortunately of a kind Jefferson had to write too often. Jefferson was having trouble paying his bills, a problem that plagued him for much of his life. This one was written on August 9, 1822, when Jefferson was age 79 yet still struggling. He writes to Samuel Garland, an attorney and friend of William Barrett, who evidently held a bond for payment due to Archibald Robertson, a merchant. Jefferson was supposed to be making semi-annual payments of $750 to Barrett. He made the first two, though evidently not quite since he says he paid $1,250, but missed the third payment entirely. Jefferson says he will make the fourth payment next month, but "I doubt I shall be able to make good the omitted installment the next year." The final payment (which he planned to pay before the missed one) was due in March, but he might be late on that one too as he may not have his tobacco crop sold in Richmond quite soon enough for timely payment. Item 25. $31,000.

 

Here is a letter that connects two of America's founders, one still very familiar, the other not as much. The letter is an offer to exchange land. The writer, the one less remembered, was John Rutledge. He was a delegate to the First and Second Continental Congress, the first Governor (actually President) of South Carolina after independence, a delegate to the Constitutional Convention (he approved it), an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and later the Second Chief Justice, appointed in 1795 (four years after this letter was written). That is when he got in trouble. He was a recess appointment made by President Washington in June. That summer, Rutledge gave a speech that was a scathing attack on the Jay Treaty. That treaty was extremely controversial, but it was backed by the Federalists and signed by Washington. When Congress reconvened, it refused to confirm Rutledge's appointment. Rutledge quickly resigned and retired from public life. The recipient was a patriot whose name is still familiar, Patrick Henry. He will long be remembered for the quote "Give me liberty or give me death." He eventually got both, but fortunately the liberty part came much sooner. In this letter, Rutledge suggests that they exchange land, Rutledge's in North Carolina near the Virginia border for Henry's in South Carolina. That would give each land closer to home. Item 1. $5,000.

 

Joe Rubinfine may be reached at 321-455-1666 or Joerubinfine@mindspring.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works<br>on Paper including Books from The Collection of The Garden Ltd<br>November 21, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Bohr (Niels). <i>On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules,</i> first edition, presentation copy, offprint 1913. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Shakespeare's Falstaff.- Henry V & Sir John Fastolf. Indenture agreement appointing Fastolf as Keeper of the Bastille of St Anthony at Paris, manuscript in French, 1421. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> World.- Purchas (Samuel). <i>Purchas his Pilgrimes. In Five Books...,</i> 5 vol., first edition, 7 folding engraved maps, contemporary calf, by William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, 1625-26. £20,000 to £30,000
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works<br>on Paper including Books from The Collection of The Garden Ltd<br>November 21, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Book of Hours.- Use of Rouen, manuscript on vellum, in Latin and French, illuminated with 14 full-page miniatures by the workshop or follower of the Maitre de l'Echevinage, Rouen, 1480s. £20,000 t0 £30,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Giese (Raban, ?scholar and medical doctor). Album Amicorum of drawing on his travels and acquaintances in Europe 1618-21, 134 watercolour illustrations including c. 60 professional miniatures, 1618-39. £30,000 to £40,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Jones (David). 14 Autograph Letters signed, 1952-68; and a small quantity of ephemera (sm. qty). £6,000 to £8,000
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works<br>on Paper including Books from The Collection of The Garden Ltd<br>November 21, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Constable (John). Various Subjects of Landscape, Characteristic of English Scenery, signed presentation inscription from Constable, 1833. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669). The Descent from the Cross: Second Plate, etching and engraving, 1633. £6,000 to £8,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Salvin (Francis Henry) and William Brodrick. <i>Falconry in the British Isles,</i> second edition, William Brodrick's copy with 3 original watercolours by him, 1873. £8,000 to £12,000
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts and Works<br>on Paper including Books from The Collection of The Garden Ltd<br>November 21, 2019</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> China.- Helman (Isidore Stanislas Henri). <i>Suite des seize estampes representant les conquetes de l'Empereur de la Chine,</i> 1783-88. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Forum Auctions, Nov. 21:</b> Pratt (Edward Roger, 1789-1863). Album of 28 watercolours and other works on paper from a journey to ancient sites and monuments in the Mediterranean, [c.1830 and later]. £3,000 to £5,000
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b><br>Dr. Seuss, pen, ink & watercolor, calendar illustration, Thomas D. Murphy Company, 1937. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Georges Lepape, <i>Sur la Terrasse,</i> gouache & pencil, cover for <i>Vogue,</i> 1930. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Charles Dana Gibson, <i>The Coming Game, Yale vs. Vassar,</i> pen & ink, for <i>Life</i> magazine, 1895. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b><br>H.A. Rey, color pencil, charcoal, watercolor & gouache, for <i>Rafi et les 9 singes,</i> 1939. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Ernest H. Shepard, pen & ink, for Kenneth Grahame’s <i>Bertie’s Escapade,</i> 1949. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Charles Schulz, <i>The Biggest Star Measured So Far,</i> ink & wash, original <i>Peanuts</i> cartoon, published 1961. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Saul Steinberg, <i>12 Biographies, A to B,</i> pen & ink with collage, final illustration in his book <i>The Labyrinth,</i> 1960. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b><br>Jo Mielziner, <i>A Streetcar Named Desire,</i> watercolor, graphite & gouache, first color study for the award-winning 1947 production. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Charles Addams, <i>Nevermore,</i> watercolor & ink, for <i>The New Yorker,</i> 1973. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> James Montgomery Flagg, <i>I Should Worry,</i> watercolor, gouache & graphite, cover for <i>Judge</i> magazine, 1914. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Edward Gorey, <i>Swan Lake, Hunters/Siegfried, Van Rothbart,</i> watercolor, pen & ink, costume designs, 1975. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Dec 10:</b> Ludwig Bemelmans, <i>Sketch for Madeline,</i> gouache & ink. $6,000 to $9,000.

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