• <b>Chiswick Auctions:</b> Rowling (J.K). <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first issue, 1997. £15,000 to £20,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Thornton (Samuel). <i>A Large Drought of the North Part of China Shewing…the Harbour of Chusan,</i> copper engraved map, 1711. £600 to £800
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Stuart (Helen). Portrait of a Maori, over-painted gelatin silver print, signed and dated, 1885. £4,000 to £6,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Picasso (Pablo). Minotaure vaincu, plate 89 from La Suite Vollard , signed, Paris, 1939. £4,000 to £5,000
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Pissarro (Camille). Vachère au Bord de l'Eau, NUMBER 14 OF 100 PROOFS, etching, 1890. £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, seeking consignments:</b> Einstein (Albert). Copy of typewritten script of the episode "The Atom" of the TV programme "Your World Tomorrow", signed by Einstein. £2,000 to £3,000
  • <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE Typed letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Important archives related to the development of fashions for Mrs. Kennedy… $4,000 to $6,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> [CASSINI-KENNEDY FASHIONS] Detailed ledger of the Kennedy White House years… $500 to $800
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KELLY, GRACE. Four autograph letters to Oleg Cassini. $5,000 to $8,000
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini. June 27</b>
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Group of Kennedy-era original fashion sketches. $1,000 to $1,500
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> KENNEDY ONASSIS, JACQUELINE. Autograph letter signed to Oleg Cassini. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini:</b> CASSINI, OLEG. Fashion sketch titled “Mrs. Kennedy-Palais de Versailles-State Dinner.” $800 to $1,200
    Doyle, The Estate of Oleg Cassini: [CASSINI, OLEG - KENNEDY, JACQUELINE.] Group of approximately 130 original fashion designs… $800 to $1,200.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> NYC pride parade photos by Hank O’Neal, annotated on verso by Allen Ginsberg, 1970s. Pictured is Marsha P. Johnson. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Neon Dancer,</i> postcard signed to Jim Fouratt, 1982. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Personal papers of Candy Darling, New York, circa 1950s-1973. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Walt Whitman, <i>Memoranda of the War,</i> Remembrance Copy, inscribed to Peter Doyle, from “the author with his love,” Camden, 1875-76. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,</i> first edition, signed, London, 1899. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> James Baldwin, <i>Giovanni’s Room,</i> first edition, presentation copy, New York, 1956. $1,800 to $2,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> JEB (Joan E. Biren), <i>Ginger and Catherine,</i> silver print, 1972. $700 to $1,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Su Negrin, <i>Gay Liberation,</i> photograph by Peter Hujar, poster published by Times Change Press, 1970. $400 to $600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Harvey Milk, Autograph Letter Signed, as acting Mayor of San Francisco, March 7, 1978. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries May 23:</b> Lester Beall, <i>Rural Electrification Administration,</i> 1939. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Gerda Wegener, <i>Two Women in a Window,</i> watercolor, chalk & wash, circa 1920. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Jean Cocteau, original sketchbook, <i>Le Mystère et Antigone,</i> including sketches of his lover Jean Desbordes, 1932. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries June 20:</b> Djuna Barnes, <i>Ladies Almanack . . . Written & Illustrated by A Lady of Fashion,</i> limited edition, signed & inscribed to her literary executor, 1928. $10,000 to $15,000.
  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Book of Hours. Illuminated manuscript, Flanders or northern France, c. 1450. With 12 full-page illuminated miniatures. £10,000 to £15,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Zahrawi, Abu’-Qasim, al- (c. 936-1013). <i>Albucasis chirurgicorum omnium,</i> Strasbourg, 1532. The first comprehensive illustrated treatise on surgery. £3,000 to £5,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Milles, Thomas. <i>The Custumers Alphabet and Primer,</i> 1608. Gilt supralibros of 17th-century English bibliophile Edward Gwynn. £2,000 to £3,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Guillemeau, Jacques. <i>Child-Birth or, the Happy Deliverie of Women,</i> 1st edition in English, 1612. The second midwifery manual printed in English. £1,500 to £2,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Rabisha, William. <i>The Whole Body of Cookery Dissected,</i> 1st edition, 1661. Rare. Five copies in libraries. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Royal binding. <i>An Abridgment of the English Military Discipline,</i> 1678. Contemporary red goatskin gilt by Samuel Mearne for Charles II (1630-1865). £1,500 to £2,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Pallavicino, Ferrante. <i>The Whores Rhetorick,</i> 1st edition in English, 1683. Rare anti-Jesuit satire. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>The Benefit of Farting,</i> 1st London edition, 1722. Teerink 19. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edwards, George. <i>Natural History of Uncommon Birds</i> [and] <i>Gleanings of Natural History,</i> 7 volumes, 1743-64. Contemporary tree calf, 362 hand-coloured engraved plates. £8,000 to £12,000
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>The Library and Picture Collection of the late Martin Woolf Orskey<br>June 26</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Campbell, Patrick. <i>Travels in the Interior Inhabited Parts of North America,</i> 1st edition, 1793. Howes C101; Sabin 10264. Uncut in original boards. £5,000 to £8,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Hearne, Samuel. <i>A Journey from Prince of Wales's Fort in Hudson's Bay, to the Northern Ocean,</i> 1st edition, 1795. Sabin 31181. Large-paper copy. £2,000 to £3,000
    <b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>June 26:</b> Edgeworth, Maria. <i>The Match Girl, A Novel,</i> 1808. £1,000 to £1,500

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - December - 2018 Issue

Contemporary Accounts from Primary Sources Uncharted Americana

803d144a-0529-4ee3-947e-09d264d6239d

Catalogue 2 from Primary Sources Uncharted Americana.

Primary Sources Uncharted Americana has released its second catalogue, Catalogue 2 Fall 2018. As their name suggests, the material goes back to original sources for historic events. You get to participate in the action as it unfolds. History is always most interesting through the eyes of those who witness it, even if such tales are not always accurate. So here we go, back in time, but with the advantage of not only the firsthand look, but the detailed explanations Primary Sources is able to give us with the benefit of further research and hindsight.

 

We begin with the only known firsthand account of the only military confrontation between the Republic of Texas and the United States. It happened at sea, between the U. S. Navy and the First Texas Navy. It was not much of a battle, but it is the best there ever was. During Texas' revolution for independence, they managed to commission a small "navy." One of those ships, after attacking a Mexican counterpart, turned on a private American ship, confiscating guns and other materials bound for Mexico. Later, the American ship's captain put in a claim in New Orleans, and when the Texas naval vessel was discovered near that port, it was overtaken by a U.S. Navy ship. It wasn't really a battle, just a ship overtaken and the crew carted off to jail in New Orleans. They were charged with piracy, but at a trial a short time later, the jury said no and the men were freed. That was it for fighting between the United States and the Republic of Texas, though 25 years later, the State of Texas would go into open warfare with the U.S. during the Civil War. The firsthand account of this confrontation was written by Lieut. James F. Miller, an officer on the American ship. Item 7. Priced at $6,500.

 

Next we have a major find in California history, an unrecorded first San Francisco imprint. It comes from early 1847. There was a small settlement in the area prior to this time then known as Yerba Buena. In the summer of 1846, it was seized by the U.S. Navy, and its second in command, Lt. Washington Allon Bartlett, was named alcalde (mayor). Its first newspaper, the California Star, debuted on January 9 of 1847. Two weeks later, Bartlett renamed the town "San Francisco." Publisher Sam Brannan felt he had no right to do so unilaterally, so he continued to call the town "Yerba Buena" in his masthead. However, he eventually relented. The last paper to carry the name Yerba Buena in the masthead was dated March 13, 1847. The March 20 issue used the new name. Item 9 is a broadside printed by Brannan in between those two newspaper editions, on March 16, 1847. It is thereby the first imprint to carry the name San Francisco. Besides that historical fact, it also recounts a major event in the city's history. The top half is a decree from General Stephen Kearny granting San Francisco ownership of its oceanfront lots. He did so on behalf of the United States, though it is dubious he had the authority to do so. The bottom half of the broadside announces the auction of said lots on June 29. San Francisco was on its way to becoming the city it is today. $150,000.

 

Item 16 is a broadside handbill presenting a major discovery - The Great Cardiff Giant! Discovered at Cardiff, Onondaga Co., N. Y. is now on Exhibition in the Geological Hall, Albany... It then lists the giant's dimensions, 10 feet, 4 1/2 inches in length, toes 6 inches long, 3 1/2 inch wide nostrils, and so on. It was dated November 29, 1869. The man was made of stone, but was still considered real - a fossilized human. It wasn't. Here is the real story. Two workers digging a well for a farmer named William "Stub" Newell of Cardiff discovered the giant when they came across the outline of a giant foot two feet down. They dug it up and Newell quickly put it on display under a tent. He charged 25 cents to see it, but as the crowds poured in, he raised the price to 50 cents. Newell next sold a 75% interest in the giant to a syndicate of businessmen headed by David Hannum for $23,000. They carted it off to Syracuse for display where it was viewed by an associate of P. T. Barnum. Barnum offered $50,000 for it, but when Hannum refused, Barnum had stonecutters make one for him, which he claimed was the original sold to him by Hannum. Barnum sold tickets to view his giant. He called Hannum's giant a fraud. Hannum sued. It was Hannum, describing the people who viewed Barnum's giant, not Barnum himself, who delivered the line, "there's a sucker born every minute." Meanwhile, the giant was viewed by archaeological experts who quickly labeled it a fraud. Yale paleontologist O. C. Marsh published a report saying he was surprised any scientific researcher would not have immediately recognized that it did not come from antiquity. So, where did it come from? It turns out, Newell's brother-in-law, an atheist named George Hull, after a discussion with a Methodist circuit rider over the authenticity of a section in the Bible claiming there had once been giants on earth, cooked up this scheme. He had a large stone taken from a quarry in Iowa shipped Chicago, where stone masons sworn to secrecy carved the figure, and then shipped it to New York. Newell and Hull buried it on Newell's farm, let it "age" for a year, and then "discovered" it. The irony is that all the parties, from Newell and Hull to Hannum and Barnum made money on the fraud. No one had to pay back a cent. However, Hannum lost his suit against Barnum for calling his giant a "fraud" because it was, though Hannum did not realize it at the time. Of course, Barnum's giant was a fraud too, but he knew it. $850.

 

Noah Webster is well known for his dictionary, even though almost two centuries have passed since he published it. That was 1828, but Webster was publishing textbooks for schoolchildren four decades earlier. In the 1780s, he published a grammar, a reader, and a speller. The first two on that list were not great successes, but the speller was. It provided Webster with the steady flow of income needed to devote his time to his major undertaking, Webster's Dictionary. His speller was first published in 1783, under the title Part I. Containing a new and accurate standard of pronunciation. That name was used for the first six editions. For the seventh edition, he changed the name to The American Spelling Book. That name lasted through at least the 260th edition. He revised the title again in 1829. Despite the popularity of the book, early editions are very scarce. There were 52 editions published prior to 1800, but Primary Sources notes that 25 of them are "ghosts," known to have existed but with no copies having survived. Item 1 is a twelfth edition, published in Providence in 1769. Most early editions were published in Boston or Hartford. This Providence edition was produced by the legendary printer John Carter. Only one other copy of this edition is known to have survived, and unlike this one, the copy at the American Antiquarian Society is incomplete. $4,500.

 

Primary Sources Uncharted Americana can be reached at 734-355-2986 or primarysources25@gmail.com. Their website is found at www.psamericana.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> Presentation Copy. Sold for $500,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Darwin, Charles. Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pp, negotiating the 2nd American edition with Appleton. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph Letter Signed, 8 pp, Paris, 1924, to his father discussing Bullfighting, Stories, and his new baby. Sold for $25,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Corialanus.</i> London, 1623. 1st printing [Extracted from the First Folio]. Sold for $50,075.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Swift, Jonathan. <i>Gulliver's Travels.</i> London, 1726. 1st edition, Teerink's A edition, fine, large copy. Sold for $21,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Fitzroy, Robert. Autograph Letter Signed to agent Thomas Stilwell, informing him of the progress of H.M.S. Beagle. Sold for $17,575.
    <center><b>Bonhams<br> Property from the Collection of Nicole and William R. Keck II</b>
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Shakespeare, William. <i>Sonnets.</i> 1901. 2 volumes. Printed on vellum and illuminated by Ross Turner, bound by Trautz-Bauzonnet. Sold for $13,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Beardsley, Aubrey. <i>The Birth, Life, and Acts of King Arthur.</i> 1893-94. 2 volumes. Contemporary painted vellum gilt by Chivers. Sold for $5,325.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Assisi, St. Francis. <i>The Canticle of Brother Sun.</i> Illuminated on vellum, for the Grolier Society. Sold for $7,575.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Proust, Marcel. <i>Du coté de chez Swann.</i> 1st edition, 1st issue. Inscribed by Proust. Sold for $8,825.
    <b>Bonhams, Jun 13 results:</b> Rackham, Arthur. <i>Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.</i> 1/500 copies signed by Rackham. Sold for $4,825.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Online<br>Now through June 21</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> THOREAU, HENRY DAVID. <i> Walden: or, Life in the Woods.</i> Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1854. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> BUKOWSKI, CHARLES. Archive of Correspondence Addressed to Kay "Kaja" Johnson, Los Angeles, California: July – November 1961. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> DICKENS, CHARLES, AND GEORGE CRUIKSHANK [ILLUSTRATOR]. Unpublished autograph letter signed, to Cruikshank, completed on the artist's proof, related to the publication of The Pic-Nic Papers. $7,000 to $10,000
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Fine Books and Manuscripts Online<br>Now through June 21</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> FEYNMAN, RICHARD. <i>"Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman!" Adventures of a Curious Character.</i> As Told to Ralph Leighton. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1985. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> GERSHWIN, GEORGE. Autograph music manuscript of "Leavin’ for de Promise’ Lan’" from the opera Porgy and Bess, Act One Scene Two. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Online, June 21:</b> LINCOLN, ABRAHAM. Document signed ("Abraham Lincoln") as sixteenth president, being a military commission for Rufus H. Johnson. $8,000 to $10,000

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