• <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> JOYCE, James. <i>Ulysses.</i> London: John Lane the Bodley Head, 1937. PRESENTATION COPY OF THE FIRST ENGLISH EDITION PRINTED IN ENGLAND. $50,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [SHACKLETON, Ernest]. –– BROWNING, Robert. <i>Poetical Works of…</i> London: Smith and Elder, 1906. PRESENTED TO SHACKLETON AND THE OFFICERS OF THE NIMROD BY A MEMBER OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York: George R. Lockwood, [1870]. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> ARISTOTLE. Opera, in Greek, parts one and two only: Organon and Natural Philosophy I. Edited by Aldus and others. Venice: Aldus Manutius, 1 November 1495–February 1498. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> COOK, James, Capt. [Collected Voyages]. First and Second Voyages: London: W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, 1773, 1777; Third Voyage: London: H. Hughes for G. Nicol and T. Cadell, 1785. $14,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CLEMENS, Samuel Langhorne (“Mark Twain”). <i>The Writings of…</i> Hartford: American Publishing Co., 1899–1900. $12,000 to $16,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>The Poems of…</i> Edited by Frederick S. Ellis. Hammersmith: William Morris for the Kelmscott Press, 1893. $12,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> LONDON, Jack. <i>The Call of the Wild.</i> New York: The Macmillan Company, 1905. PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED BY LONDON. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> CROWLEY, Aleister (1875–1947). <i>The Winged Beetle.</i> London: privately printed, 1910. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b><center>Potter & Potter Auctions<br>Fine Books & Manuscripts<br>October 20, 2022</b></center>
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> WILDE, Oscar (“C.3.3.”). <i>The Ballad of Reading Gaol.</i> London: Leonard Smithers, January 1898. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> DRYDEN, John. <i>Fables Ancient and Modern; translated into verse from Homer, Ovid, Boccace, & Chaucer: with original poems.</i> London: John Tonson, 1700. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter, Oct. 20:</b> [MAP]. LINSCHOTEN, Jan Huygen van. <i>Delineatio Orarum Maritimarum…</i> London: John Wolfe, 1598. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <center><b>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autograph & Documents<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> John Adams Signed Ship's Passport, partly printed DS as president, signed “John Adams.”
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Extremely Rare James Garfield DS as President Appointing Revenue Service Agent.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Babe Ruth 1939 Cooperstown cover boldly signed — with photo.
    <center><b>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autograph & Documents<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Incredible Harry S. Truman Kansas City Auto Club sales ledger maintained by Truman!
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Important Herbert Hoover 4 pg ALS about Chinese Gold Mining.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Rare Calvin Coolidge ALS as President.
    <center><b>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autograph & Documents<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Abraham Lincoln Signed Appointment.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Ironic John Kennedy Jr. Handwritten report on why he is accident report form when he attended Collegiate School in 1975.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Katherine Bates Signed -“America! America! God shed his grace on thee.”
    <center><b>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autograph & Documents<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Apollo 11 - Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin & Michael Collins.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Amassed Over Four Decades, an impressive 1100+ piece collection of entertainment and notables.
    <b>One of a Kind, Sep. 29:</b> Mark Twain / Samuel Clemens Signed Letter and Card.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - May - 2021 Issue

Coming Soon - Digital Collectible Books?

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Beeple's 5000 Everydays (Christie's photo).

One advantage we always thought physical books had over their digital counterparts is that physical books are collectible. There is no way you could collect a book composed of ephemeral electronic impulses, a copy of which everyone on earth could have on their computer. Where is the substance? Where is the rarity? So much for common wisdom. Our perceptions were stunned a few weeks ago when a digital artwork sold for an astonishing $69.3 million at Christie's. Seriously. There is nothing on canvas, no physical painting. What the buyer got was a digital file, the same (almost) as every other one you can copy off the internet for free.

 

Welcome to the world of NFTs. NFTs are non-fungible tokens. There, that explains it. I don't understand it either. “Non-fungible” means one of a kind, it cannot be replaced by something else. An original painting is non-fungible, a print fungible. Tokens are those things that make cryptocurrency work. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, and one bitcoin can be replaced by another. They are fungible; they are all the same. An NFT adds a marker to the token that makes it unique. Your NFT, unlike your bitcoin, is not exactly like every other.

 

Still, there is nothing you can touch, hang on the wall, put on a shelf, even flip like a baseball card. It is just an image you view on a computer screen. I guess you can somehow display the token to your friends to show that yours is the “original” copy, but who is going to pay for that? The answer is someone just paid $69.3 million for it, so I guess we need to rethink that.

 

The artwork is called Everydays: The First 5000 Days. It is a collage of images from the Everydays series. The artist is “Beeple,” the art-name of Mike Winkelmann, age 39. He reminds me of Banksy, except we know who he is. "Beeple" is comparably self-effacing. On his website, Winkelmann (who refrained from using capital letters) writes, “he makes a variety of art crap across a variety of media. some of it is ok, but a lot of it kind of blows ass. he’s working on making it suck less everyday though so bear with him.” It's reminiscent of Banksy and his “I can't believe you morons actually buy this shit.” Like Banksy, his artwork is better than he makes it out to be, but still, $69.3 million for a digital file?

 

So, will we see books offered to collectors as NFTs? Unless this whole concept blows over really soon, I think it is inevitable. Not just art but videos, music, cards, all sorts of things are being sold now as NFTs. Books, which are now available as e-books, are an ideal use. A famous author could sell their first copy, in effect the manuscript, typed on a computer, as an NFT for big bucks. If you think an NFT of some text is a stretch, Jack Dorsey, founder of Twitter, sold his first “tweet” for $2.9 million. Yes, a first copy of an e-book can be sold as an NFT. Furthermore, NFTs can be created that are virtually identical, so the author could have a first edition of NFTs “printed” in a limited run of 50 copies and sell each of these, not as rare as a one-of-a-kind, but still rare. Presumably, the author could even digitally sign each of the digital copies to make them even more valuable.

 

Is this the future of collecting, or at least, a viable alternative to traditional collecting? Obviously, whoever paid $69.3 million for Beeple's artwork thinks so. Yes, you can display a picture that looks the same on your computer screen, or read an e-book that looks the same on your e-reader, and not notice the difference whether there is a multi-million dollar token with it or not. But, that is also true with prints, first and second printings or editions of books, or photographs, which all look essentially the same. For example, contemporaneously printed photos off the same negative are far more valuable than look-alike ones printed later, though they look the same. Some unnoticeable feature, like a watermark on the paper, makes all the difference. Perhaps the ability to have a look-alike digital version is not so critical after all.

 

You might argue that you cannot display your digital collection the way you can your physical one. You can only look at it on a computer monitor. Sort of, but you can now put up an electronic screen on the wall to display your artwork. You can show your picture, or alternatively, a picture of a bookshelf housing your e-books. Even better, you could have the screen on your wall scroll through your “paintings,” or scroll through images of the covers or title pages of your books. You are no longer limited to just displaying spines. Advantage, digital.

 

Of course, that still leaves the issue of not having something you can physically hold, traditionally such a major part of collecting. That is too big an obstacle for me. I want to be able to touch what I collect. But so what? I am not of the digital age. I may consider myself non-fungible, one of a kind, but to sellers of books and art, I am fungible. I can be replaced by another customer, so why should they care what I think? The reality is that the next customer more and more will be someone born of the digital age, for whom this type of collecting may make more sense than it does to me.

 

So, is this the future of collecting or just a temporary fad? We look to Winkelmann for an answer. He told Fox News, “I absolutely think it’s a bubble, to be quite honest. I go back to the analogy of the beginning of the internet. There was a bubble. And the bubble burst.” However, there is a second part to that quote, “But it didn’t wipe out the internet. And so the technology itself is strong enough where I think it’s going to outlive that.” Perhaps we won't see too many more $69 million price tags, or more of the other sky-high prices we have recently seen, but that doesn't mean this form of collecting will go away. The Dutch tulip bubble ended and people no longer pay ridiculous prices for tulips, but they still buy them. Perhaps there is a place for digital collecting, even if I won't be a participant. NFTs may survive, but these prices still look like a bubble to me.


Posted On: 2021-05-10 18:50
User Name: kenm

Hi Michael - perhaps a bit of a quibble but I don't think prints are fungible. If I lend you $10 then when you repay me, you don't need to return the exact $10 bill - because, in most cases, currency is fungible.
On the other hand, if I lend a museum a print for a gallery show (even a relatively common print) then when the show comes down, the museum can't give me a different copy of the print. I want my copy back.
Prints are not fungible which is why prints are considered to be each a unique piece of art.
regards
Ken


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Extensive archive of papers of Lincoln’s Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> George Catlin, <i>North American Indian Portfolio,</i> 1844. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> The Twenty-Four Books of the Holy Scriptures, Carefully Translated…after the Best Jewish Authorities, Philadelphia, 1853-54. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Printed & Manuscript Americana<br>September 29, 2022</b>
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Wedding book of Eleanor Roosevelt’s bodyguard, Earl Miller, signed by the Roosevelts, 1932. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Textile titled <i>The Resignation of Pres’t Washington,</i> Scotland, circa 1800. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Gideon Welles, Pass for President Lincoln’s White House funeral, 1865. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann September 29:</b> Confirmation of arms and nobility in favor of the Diez y Mora family, Madrid, 1710. $2,500 to $3,500.
  • <b><center>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on paper<br>Thursday 29th September 2022</b>
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> South America.- Conquest of Peru.- Cieza De León (Pedro de). <i>Parte primera de la chronica del Peru,</i> first edition, Seville, Martín de Montesdoca, 1553. £50,000 to £70,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Asia.- Mandeville (Sir John). <i>Tractato bellissimo delle piu maravigliose cose & piu motabile che sitrovino nelle parte delmondo,</i> Florence, [Lorenzo Morgiani], 1496-99. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Bible leaf, Latin. Single leaf from the Gutenberg Bible, [Mainz], [Johann Gutenberg & Johann Fust], [c.1454/55]. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b><center>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on paper<br>Thursday 29th September 2022</b>
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Publicius (Jacobus). <i>Ars oratoria. Ars epistolandi. Ars memorativa,</i> first edition, Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 1482. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Biblia Pauperum.- Single leaf from a blockbook Biblia Pauperum in Latin, from the Wiblingen copy of Schreiber's edition III, Netherlands, 1465. £25,000 to £35,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> South America.- Brazil.- Steinmann (Johan Jacob). <i>Souvenirs de Rio de Janeiro,</i> Paris, chez Rittner & Goupil, 1837. £20,000 to £30,000.
    <b><center>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on paper<br>Thursday 29th September 2022</b>
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Asia.- Polo (Marco). <i>In cui si tratta le meravigliose cose del mondo per lui vedute,</i> Venice, Matteo Pagano, 1555. £20,000 to £30,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Sir Joshua Reynolds' copy.- Donne (John). <i>Poems, by J.D. With elegies on the authors death,</i> the Joshua Reynolds-Philip Bliss copy of the first edition, Printed by M[iles]. F[lesher]. for Iohn Marriot, 1633. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Gilbert (William). <i>De Magnete,</i> first edition, Peter Short, 1600. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <b><center>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on paper<br>Thursday 29th September 2022</b>
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Audubon (John James). <i>The Birds of America,</i> 8 vol., New York, George R. Lockwood, [c.1889]. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Pratchett (Terry). <i>The Colour of Magic,</i> first edition, signed by the author, 1983. £5,000 to £7,000.
    <b>Forum, Sep. 29:</b> Flaubert (Gustave). <i>Trois Contes,</i> first edition, one of 100 copies on papier de Hollande, Paris, Charpentier, 1877. £5,000 to £7,000.

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