• <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Ortelius (Abraham). <i>Theatrum Orbis Terrarum,</i> folio, Antwerp, 1570, First Edition (2nd Issue), 53 double-page maps, contemporary hand colouring. €40,000 to €60,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> An original engraved facsimile copy of the Declaration of Independence of 4 July 1776, issued by order of Congress on 4 July 1823 in a limited edition of 200 copies on fine parchment. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Ulysses.</i> Shakespeare & Co., Rue de l’Odeon, Paris 1922. No. 559 of 1000 Copies of the First Edn.,, one of 750 Copies on handmade paper. €10,000 to €15,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Malton (James) [1761-1803]. A fine quality set of twenty-five hand coloured aquatint Views of Dublin, as published for <i>A Picturesque and Descriptive View of the City of Dublin</i>. €6,000 to €7,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> 'Bloody Sunday.' An original Admission Ticket to Croke Park, Great Challenge Match (Football), Tipperary v. Dublin, Sunday, November 21,1920. Pink card, 3 ins x 4 ¼ ins. €4,000 to €5,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Joyce (James). <i>Haveth Childers Everywhere - Fragment from Work in Progress,</i> Paris & N.Y., 1930, First Edn., Signed and Limited No. 50 (100) Copies. €4,000 to €6,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Edward Lyons, Irish (1726-1801). Genealogy: <i>The FitzGerald's Arms of Carton House, Kildare,</i> pen and ink and watercolour on laid paper. €3,000 to €4,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Yeats (William Butler). <i>Poems.</i> Cuala Press, D. 1935, stiff blue paper covers, unlettered as issued, coloured initials and ornaments hand-drawn by Elizabeth Corbet Yeats. One of 300 copies. €2,000 to €3,000.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> A fine and important collection of Ulster Wit. Belfast Political Scrapbook, 19th century. €1,500 to €2,000.
    <center><b>Fonsie Mealy’s<br>Christmas Rare Books<br>& Collectors' Sale<br>December 7th & 8th, 2021</b>
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Rare Views of the Giant's Causeway. Coloured Prints: Drury (Susanna) [1698-1770]. A rare pair of original Engraved Prints. €1,200 to €1,500.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> [Johnson (Rev. Samuel)]. <i>Julian the Apsostate Being a Short Account of his Life, together with a Comparison of Popery and Paganism,</i> L., 1682, First Edn. €800 to €1,200.
    <b>Fonsie Mealy’s, Dec. 7-8:</b> Aringhi (Pauli). <i>Roma Subterranea Novissima,</i> 2 vols. lg. folio Rome (Typis Vitalis Mascardi) 1651. €350 to €750.
  • <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> SITTING BULL SIGNED PHOTO (The Finest in Existence).
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> The Beatles Signed Photo Card and the Make-Up Sponge Used During the Historic February 1964 Ed Sullivan Performance.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Extremely Rare John Wesley Hardin Signature from a Texas Cattle Brand Book, early 1870s.
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Albert Einstein "refugee intellectuals of the Hitler persecution.”
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> LYNDON B. JOHNSON Personally Owned & Worn STETSON HAT.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Sigmund Freud Typed Letter Signed in English "I am still on the road to health, but I have not arrived."
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Nixon’s All Time Baseball All Star Team and the Reporter that helped change the 1972 Presidential Election!
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Incredible signed ''Atomic Energy for Military Purposes'' -by Enrico Fermi & Robert Oppenheimer and- Also Signed by Four Other Manhattan Project Scientists Who Developed the First Atomic Bomb.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Samuel Adams, Signer of Declaration Of Independence, Signed Military Appointment.
    <b><center>One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions<br>Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Entertainment and Sports Auction<br>December 9th</b>
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Orville Wright & Glenn Martin Signed Photograph.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Thomas Jefferson, a Magnificent Large Signature.
    <b>One of a Kind Collectibles, Dec. 9:</b> Robert E. Lee ALS, “Suffering people of the South … blessing of God.”
  • <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 47. Roosevelt, Theodore. Photograph inscribed to Morris J. Hirsch. May 7th 1918. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 178. Whitman, Walt. <i>Leaves of Grass.</i> Brooklyn, New York: [Printed for the author], 1955. First edition in the first issue binding. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 38. Mather, Cotton. <i>Magnalia Christi Americana; or, the Ecclesiastical History of New-England.</i> London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, 1702. First edition. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 55. Taylor, Zachary. Autograph letter signed as President-Elect. Baton Rouge: January 15, 1849. $5,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 203. Picasso, Pablo. <i>Verve</i> Vol. V, Nos. 19-20. Paris: Editions Verve, 1948. Inscribed on the title page by Picasso. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b><center>Doyle<br>Rare Books, Autographs & Maps<br>December 9</b>
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 211. Domergue, Jean-Gabriel. L'Ete a Monte Carlo. Lithographed poster, Lucien Serre & Cie, Paris, circa 1937. $1,000 to $1,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 105. Manuscript Illumination attr. to Neri da Rimini. Large excised initial "N" from a choirbook, extensively historiated. [Likely Rimini: first quarter of the 14th century]. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 40. McKenney, Thomas L. and Hall, James. <i>History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs.</i> Philadelphia: Rice, Rutter & Co., 1870. $3,00
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 222. Searle, Ronald. [Pets--a dog, cats and a parrot-- surrounded by books, and inspecting a globe, perhaps planning global domination]. Original drawing, 17 3/8 x 13 1/2 inches. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Doyle, Rare Books, Autographs & Maps:</b> Lot 98. Faden, William; Scull, Nicholas and George Heap. A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia, Survey'd by N. Scull and G. Heap. London: William Faden, 12 March 1777. $3,000 to $5,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin"), to Benjamin Vaughan asserting the primacy of American independence in negotiating the Treaty of Paris, Passy, July 11, 1782. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. Autograph Letter Signed ("B. Franklin") to David Hartley addressing Hartley's final issues with the recently completed ratification of the Treaty of Paris, Passy, June 2, 1784. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> MASON & DIXON. A hand-colored contemporary manuscript map titled in cartouche, "A Map of that Part of AMERICA where a degree of LATITUDE was measured for the ROYAL SOCIETY, by Chas Mason & Jer: Dixon," c.1768. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS. Autograph Manuscript Signed ("WB Yeats"), a fair copy of "When Helen Lived" for John Preece headed ("For John Preece"), framed. $5,000 to $7,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> "LINCOLN SEATED." KECK, CHARLES, sculptor. 1875-1951. Patinated bronze, 1950. Louise Taper Collection. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S FINAL HOURS. BURNS, J., painter. <i>Death-Bed of Abraham Lincoln.</i> Oil on canvas, 1866. Collection of Louise Taper. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> FILSON, CHARLES PATTERSON, painter. 1860-1937. <i>Portrait of Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's Secretary of War.</i> $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> A MATZOS BOX PRESENTED BY THE MANISHEVITZ BROTHERS TO WARREN G. HARDING. Louise Taper Collection. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> LEWIS CARROLL. Original albumen print photograph, approximately 6 7/8 x 8 3/4 inches, Chelsea, London, October 7, 1863, of the Rossetti Family at home, one of only three known examples of the full image. $50,000 to $70,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. <i>Verses ... Dedicated to Her Mother.</i> Privately printed, 1847. First edition of her first book, printed at her grandfather's press, THE ROSSETTI FAMILY COPY. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> CHRISTINA ROSSETTI. Original drawing of snowdrops in purple pencil, sent by CGR to Lucy Rossetti, inscribed "I doubt whether you will make out my copy from nature," 1887. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Bonhams, Dec. 15:</b> DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI, et al. The Germ: <i>Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art.</i> Fine copy in a Doves binding by Cobden Sanderson. $12,000 to $18,000.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - August - 2019 Issue

From The Road to Serfdom to After the Fall

8b265cdc-6984-461c-bb89-3f449b7a365d

Cover of the 1944 first edition of F.A. Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom.

F.A. Hayek's The Road to Serfdom is an economics and social philosophy classic that seems to take on new meaning as we go into the 2020 elections and cries of “socialism” ricochet across the political spectrum. Socialism, after all, is the book’s primary focus - and though the lens has become a little cloudy with the passage of time - it may be relevant to the present situation to revisit this 75 year old treatise.

 

Hayek was a noted academic from Vienna who shared the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1974. He wrote The Road to Serfdom during the war years and published it in England (Routledge) in 1944. It was followed by the first American edition (University of Chicago) a little later the same year.

 

Though its message was directed at wartime Britain it was quickly taken up by US readers and went through multiple printings. Its popularity was helped along by a Reader’s Digest condensation which gave the work an enormous mass audience. Reduced to a sentence the message is that socialism and collective planning designed to create utopias can ultimately have the opposite effect and lead to chilling authoritarian regimes. Or as Wikipedia puts it: “Hayek challenged the general view among British academics that fascism (including National Socialism)was a capitalist reaction against socialism. He argued that fascism, National Socialism and socialism had common roots in central economic planning and empowering the state over the individual.”

 

Whether or not history ultimately sustains that verdict The Road to Serfdom is often cited as an extremely influential book: Modern Library ranked it #16 in a reader survey of the hundred best non-fiction book of the twentieth century. In 2010 it briefly surged to the top of the Amazon best seller list following airplay from right wing radio personality Glenn Beck. Since then the interest has diminished somewhat, but is still significant. Presently Amazon pegs it at #120 in the 'political economy' category.

 

Typically The Road to Serfdom travels in the same circles as Atlas Shrugged and usually clutched to the bosom of the those with strong Libertarian leanings. I find myself reading it because of the demonization of the so-called “socialist” agenda is currently gaining momentum in the upcoming American elections and I’m intrigued by its analysis of "intellectuals" aka teachers, writers, media types (and probably book dealers by extension) as "tools of the state." So it is not without considerable trepidation that I - your quintessential elderly old school Humanities grad aka left-leaning liberal intellectual - advise you to crack out a copy and ponder its message given the current political climate.

 

As the saying goes, “Everything old is new again.”

 

Under the headingThe Great Utopia’ Hayek writes “It is rarely remembered now that socialism in its beginnings was frankly authoritarian. It began quite openly as a reaction against the liberalism of the French Revolution. The French writers who laid its foundation had no doubt that their ideas could be put into practice only by a strong dictatorial government … To make this argument sound plausible, the word ‘freedom’ was subjected to a subtle change in meaning.

 

The word had formerly meant freedom from coercion, from the arbitrary power of other men. Now it was made to mean freedom from necessity, release from the compulsion of the circumstances which inevitably limit the range of choice of all of us. Freedom in this sense is, of course, merely another name for power or wealth. The demand for the new freedom was thus only another name for the old demand for a redistribution of wealth.”

 

In Hayek’s view centralized planning is the great villain: He asserted, ”Planning leads to dictatorship because dictatorship is the most effective instrument of coercion and, as such, essential if central planning on a large scale is to be possible.” Moving on to ‘Why the Worst Get on Tophe comes up with some insights which seem prophetic, but perhaps not in the sense originally intended.

 

To wit: “Just as the democratic statesman who sets out to plan economic life will soon be confronted with the alternative of either assuming dictatorial powers or abandoning his plans, so the totalitarian leader would soon have to choose between disregard of ordinary morals and failure. It is for this reason that the unscrupulous are likely to be more successful in a society tending toward totalitarianism.

 

The totalitarian leader must collect around him a group which is prepared voluntarily to submit to that discipline they are to impose by force upon the rest of the people. …

 

There are three main reasons why such a numerous group, with fairly similar views, is not likely to be formed by the best but rather by the worst elements of any society. First, the higher the education and intelligence of individuals become, the more their tastes and views are differentiated. If we wish to find a high degree of uniformity in outlook, we have to descend to the regions of lower moral and intellectual standards where the more primitive instincts prevail. This does not mean that the majority of people have low moral standards; it merely means that the largest group of people whose values are very similar are the people with low standards.

 

Second, since this group is not large enough to give sufficient weight to the leader’s endeavours, he will have to increase their numbers by converting more to the same simple creed. He must gain the support of the docile and gullible, who have no strong convictions of their own but are ready to accept a ready-made system of values if it is only drummed into their ears sufficiently loudly and frequently. It will be those whose vague and imperfectly formed ideas are easily swayed and whose passions and emotions are readily aroused who will thus swell the ranks of the totalitarian party.

 

Third, to weld together a closely coherent body of supporters, the leader must appeal to a common human weakness. It seems to be easier for people to agree on a negative programme – on the hatred of an enemy, on the envy of the better off – than on any positive task.”

 

Referring to socialism in Britain in the 1940s Hayek writes: “Advancement within a totalitarian group or party depends largely on a willingness to do immoral things … Once you admit that the individual is merely a means to serve the ends of the higher entity called society or the nation, most of those features of totalitarianism which horrify us follow of necessity... intolerance and brutal suppression of dissent, deception and spying, the complete disregard of the life and happiness of the individual are essential and unavoidable. Acts which revolt all our feelings, such as the shooting of hostages or the killing of the old or sick, are treated as mere matters of expediency; the compulsory uprooting and transportation of hundreds of thousands becomes an instrument of policy approved by almost everybody except the victims. … “It is not difficult to deprive the great majority of independent thought. But the minority who will retain an inclination to criticize must also be silenced. Public criticism or even expressions of doubt must be suppressed because they tend to weaken support of the regime.”

 

It is interesting that these brief excerpts about the perceived shortcomings of socialism eerily echo the tone set by the present administration, which has apparently adopted all the defining “socialistic” characteristics which Hayek thinks lead inevitably to despotism, while at the same time denouncing “socialism” itself as “unAmerican.”

 

But what about now? While Googling around trying to find a non-Libertarin take on this retro view of economics I happened upon a stunning essay by John Lanchester in the July 1, 2018 issue of the London Review of Books titled After the Fall. Though he might not have a Nobel Prize, Lanchester’s analysis on where we really are now and who is really calling the shots is much more on target (and a lot easier to read) than Hayek.

 

Forget about socialist bogeyman, think the banks.

 

Napoleon said something interesting: “that to understand a person, you must understand what the world looked like when he was twenty, I think there’s a lot in that,” Lanchester writes. “When I was twenty, it was 1982, right in the middle of the Cold War and the Thatcher/Reagan years. Interest rates were well into double digits, inflation was over 8 per cent, there were three million unemployed, and we thought the world might end in nuclear holocaust at any moment.

 

At the same time, the underlying premise of capitalism was that it was morally superior to the alternatives. Mrs. Thatcher was a philosophical conservative for whom the ideas of Hayek and Friedman were paramount: capitalism was practically superior to the alternatives, but that was intimately tied to the fact that it was morally better.”

 

Lanchester starts off observing that “odds were long” on many unexpected leaders and events “following the crash a decade ago,” but adds without irony, “5000 to 1 pales in comparison with the odds you would have got in 2008 on a future world in which Donald Trump was president.”

 

The most important component of the intellectual landscape of 2008 was a widespread feeling among elites that things were working fine. Not for everyone and not everywhere, but in aggregate: more people were doing better than were doing worse. People had lived through crises before – but what happened in those cases was that capital fled from one place to another. No one had ever lived through, and no one thought possible, a situation where all the credit simultaneously disappeared from everywhere and the entire system teetered on the brink.

 

The first weekend of October 2008 was a point when people at the top of the global financial system genuinely thought, in the words of George W. Bush, ‘This sucker could go down.’“

 

Lanchester turns his attention to the meaning of “impunity:”

 

Impunity, he writes, is the sense that these things had consequences for us but not for the people who caused the crisis, has been central to the story of the last ten years. It has also been central to the public anger generated by the crash and the Great Recession. Speaking on a book tour in 2010 he observed, “All the questions were about whose fault the crash was, who should be punished, how it was possible that this could have happened and how outrageous it was that the people responsible had got away with it and the rest of society was paying the consequences. ...

 

By now we’re eight years into that public anger. Remember that remark made by Robert Lucas, the macroeconomist, that the central problem of depression prevention had been solved? How’s that been working out? How it’s been working out here in the UK is the longest period of declining real incomes in recorded economic history. ‘Recorded economic history’ means as far back as current techniques can reach, which is back to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Worse than the decades that followed the Napoleonic Wars, worse than the crises that followed them, worse than the financial crises that inspired Marx, worse than the Depression, worse than both world wars. That is a truly stupendous statistic and if you knew nothing about the economy, sociology or politics of a country, and were told that single fact about it – that real incomes had been falling for the longest period ever – you would expect serious convulsions in its national life.

 

We thus arrive at the topic that more than any other sums up the decade since the crash: inequality. For students of the subject there is something a little crude about referring to inequality as if it were only one thing. Inequality of income is not the same thing as inequality of wealth, which is not the same as inequality of opportunity, which is not the same as inequality of outcome, which is not the same as inequality of health or inequality of access to power. In a way, though, the popular use of inequality, although it may not be accurate in philosophical or political science terms, is the most relevant when we think about the last ten years, because when people complain about inequality they are complaining about all the above: all the different subtypes of inequality compacted together.

 

The sense that there are different rules for insiders, the one per cent, is global. Everywhere you go people are preoccupied by this widening crevasse between the people at the top of the system and everyone else. It’s possible of course that this is a trick of perspective or a phenomenon of raised consciousness more than it is a new reality: that this is what our societies have always been like, that elites have always lived in a fundamentally different reality, it’s just that now, after the last ten difficult years, we are seeing it more clearly. I suspect that’s the analysis Marx would have given.

 

The one per cent issue is the same everywhere … In the US there is enormous anger at oblivious, entitled, seemingly invulnerable financial and technological elites getting ever richer as ordinary living standards stay flat in absolute terms, and in relative terms, dramatically decline. And everywhere, more than ever before in human history, people are surrounded by images of a life they are told they should want, yet know they can’t afford.”

 

I submit that discussions of socialism vs. capitalism in today’s world are totally irrelevant, the reddest of red herrings. Lanchester is correct: what we're really dealing with is raw anger: despite prosperity for a few, the true picture is an economic death spiral for the many.

 

I’d never read a word of John Lanchester before dipping into Hayek, but if we’re looking for prophecy disguised as economic theory may I suggest that it is Lanchester not Hayek who has the pole position.

 

Whether you agree or not, I strongly suggest you read his essay (link below).

 

Read the entire After the Fallessay by John Lanchester published in the London Review of Books 2018 at https://www.lrb.co.uk/v40/n13/john-lanchester/after-the-fall

 

Find the Reader’s Digest condensation of Hayek’s Road to Serfdomat https://mises.org/sites/default/files/Road%20to%20serfdom.pdf


Posted On: 2019-08-15 21:38
User Name: gfwbooks

Wow. Just came to this late - very informative, thank you Ms. Halas. Now and then, I read some of the "bibles" constantly referred to as mind changing by conservatives, to understand the perspective. Read The Road to Serfdom, and found it refreshingly concise and enlightening, for the specific period and context in which it was written. As I got into the book, my thought was that Hayek might be turning in his grave at some of the liberties taken with his theories since then. Now to Lanchester.


Rare Book Monthly

  • <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> De Wit’s composite atlas with magnificent full original color. $125,000 to $150,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Gardner's photographic sketch book of the Civil War. $200,000 to $250,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Waugh Oil Painting, 70 Degrees North; The Polar Bear. $400,000 to $600,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquatint, Ivory-Billed Woodpecker. $75,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Blaeu terrestrial table globe, 1602. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Audubon aquautint, Ruby-Throated Humming Bird. $35,000 to $45,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Bessa original watercolor of a bouquet of flowers. $75,000 to $125,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> John Gould's only work devoted to American birds. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Wyld & Malby pair of terrestrial & celestial globes, 1833. $50,000 to $75,000.
    <center><b>Arader Galleries<br>Live Auction<br>December 11, 2021</b>
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Leutze map of the world oil painting. $70,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Caula, the finest 18th century drawing of Lison. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Arader Galleries, Dec. 11:</b> Scolari / Blaeu map of Germania, 1650. $15,000 to $22,000.
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Zang Tumb Tuuum:<br>la révolution futuriste<br>Online Auction<br>30 November – 7 December</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 18:</b> The "Official Edition" of the United States Constitution and the First Printing of the Final Text of the Constitution, 1787. $15,000,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso. I Paroliberi Futuristi. 1914-1915. 8 p. Unique corrected proofs, for an anthology that remained unpublished. €40,000 to €60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Cangiullo, Francesco. Studenti in Lettere. Università. 1915. Seminal work, featured in 3 historical futurist exhibitions. €20,000 to €30,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Cangiullo, Francesco. Chiaro di luna. Circa 1915. Collage and gouache on paper. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, Nov. 30 – Dec. 7:</b> Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso. Manicure. Faire les ongles à l'Italie. Circa 1915. A fantastic parody of an advertising poster. €20,000 to €30,000.
  • <i>Der Sturm.</i> 1922. Sold October 2021 for € 13,000.
    Diophantus Alexandrinus, <i>Arithmeticorum libri sex.</i> 1670. Sold October 2021 for € 18,000.
    <i>Cozzani Ettore e altri, l’Eroica. Tutto il pubblicato.</i> Sold October 2021 for € 11,000.
    Newton Isaac, <i>Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica.</i> 1714. Sold October 2021 for € 7,500.
    Manetti Saverio, <i>Storia naturale degli uccelli.</i> 1767-1776. Sold April 2021 for € 26,000.
  • <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> John James Audubon, <i>Carolina Parrot, Plate 26,</i> hand-colored aquatint, 1828. $80,000 to $100,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Francisco Henrique Carls, <i>Album de Pernambuco e seus Arrabaldes,</i> 53 plates, Recife, circa 1873. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Capt. Thomas Davies, group of five engraved topographical scenes of North American waterfalls, London, 1768. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <center><b>Swann Auction Galleries<br>Maps & Atlases<br>Natural History<br>& Color Plate Books<br>December 9, 2021</b>
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> William R. Morley, <i>Morley’s Map of New Mexico,</i> New Mexico, 1873. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> Paul Hariot, <i>Le Livre d’Or des Roses,</i> Paris, 1903. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann, Dec. 9:</b> D. Miguel Geli, album of finely hand-drawn studies for nineteenth-century Spanish forts and military bunkers, circa 1830. $1,200 to $1,800.
  • <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
    <b><center>Christie’s<br>Valuable Books and Manuscripts<br>December 15</b>
  • <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of hours of Jean Boutin]. Illuminated manuscript on vellum, use of Rome, in Latin and French. France, early 15th century. From €50,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Pontifical illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin. Southern France, late 15th century. From €40,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin and French. France, late 15th century. From €40,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Officium B. Mariae Virginis. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, use of Rome, in Latin and Italian. 1482. From €40,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Book of Hours]. Manuscript on parchment, in French. Amiens, 14th century. From €10,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. 9 handwritten lines signed by Luisa Miller, with a dedication 'to Monsieur Felix Le Couppey, Paris 24 Jan. 1852'. From €8,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> French Renaissance binding, produced in Lyon or Paris in the second half of the 16th century. Rhetoricorum secundus tomus in Gryphius' edition of 1548. From €800.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Printing and the Mind of Man]. Gesner, Conrad. <i>Vogelbuch Darinn die art, natur und eigenschafft aller vöglen.</i> Zurigo, Froschauer, 1581, 1583, 1585, 1589. From €10,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Dalmatia]. Berlinghieri, Francesco. Tabula quinta de Europa. Florence, Niccolò di Lorenzo della Magna, [before September 1482]. From €8,000.
    <b><center>Aste Bolaffi<br>Rare Books and Autographs<br>December 16, 2021</b>
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> Giampiccoli, Giuliano. Jacobo Comiti Duratio […] Tabulas a Marco Ricci Auctore, Julianus Giampiccoli incidit. Venezia, Teodoro Viero, 1775. €30,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Piazzetta]. Pitteri, Marco. Studj di pittura gia dissegnati da Giambatista Piazzetta ed ora con l'intaglio di Marco Pitteri. Venezia, Giovanni Battista Albrizzi, 1760. From €4,000.
    <b>Aste Bolaffi, Dec. 16:</b> [Printing and the Mind of Man]. Palladio, Andrea. <i>I quattro libri dell'architettura.</i> Venezia, Domenico de' Franceschi, 1570. From €14,000.
  • <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> British Isles. Waldseemuller (Martin), <i>Tabula Nova Hibernie Anglie et Scotie,</i> Strasbourg, 1513. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Americas. Speed (John), <i>America with those known parts in that unknowne worlde, both people and manner of Buildings. Discribed and inlarged by J. S.</i> 1626. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Howitt (Samuel, and others). <i>Foreign Field Sports, Fisheries, Sporting Anecdotes... Containing 100 Plates. With a Supplement of New South Wales,</i> 1st edition, 2 parts in 1, London, 1814. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Thomson (Joseph). <i>Through Masai Land,</i> 1st edition, London: Sampson Low & Co, 1885. £600 to £800.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Johnson (Samuel). <i>A Dictionary of the English Language,</i> 2 volumes, 1st edition, London: W. Strahan for J. and P. Knapton, 1755. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Einstein (Albert). <i>Relativity. The Special and the General Theory,</i> 1st edition in English, London: Methuen, 1920. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Stoker (Bram). <i>Dracula,</i> 1st edition, 1st issue, London: Archibald Constable, 1897. £12,000 to £15,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Fleming (Ian). <i>Casino Royale,</i> 1st edition, 1st impression, 1st issue dust jacket, London: Jonathan Cape, 1953. £10,000 to £15,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Lewis (C.S.). <i>The Chronicles of Narnia,</i> 1st editions, London: Geoffrey Bles, 1950-56. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <center><b>Dominic Winter Auctioneers<br>15/16 December 2021<br>Printed Books, Maps & Autographs, Children’s Books & Playing Cards, Modern First Editions</b>
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Herbert (Frank). <i>Dune,</i> 1st edition, 2nd issue, Philadelphia; Chilton Book Company, 1965. £1,000 to £1,500.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Walsingham (Thomas, 1561- 1630). Courtier to Queen Elizabeth I and literary patron to Christopher Marlowe. An extremely rare autograph signature, ‘Tho: Walsingham’, Kent, 28 July 1608. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Dominic Winter, Dec. 15/16:</b> Von Harbou (Thea). <i>Metropolis,</i> 1st edition in English, 1st issue, London: The Reader's Library, 1927. £700 to £1,000.

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions