• <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin and French Book of Hours, around 1490. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br> P. Goos, <i>Le Grand Miroir de la Mer,</i> 1669. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. Feininger, Letter with woodcuts, 1920. Est: € 25,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin Bible manuscript, 12th century. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. E. Bloch, <i>Naturgeschichte der Fische,</i> 1782-95. Est: € 40,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. Chagall, <i>Daphnis & Chloé,</i> 1961. Est: € 90,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. J. Waghenaer, <i>Speculum nauticum,</i> 1586. Est: € 180,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>P. J. de Pannemaeker, Collection of orig. watercolors, 1878-1887.<br>Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> 1918.<br>Est: € 15,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br><i>Livro dos prestimonios,</i> Manuscript, 1665. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 18,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>J. Miró in J. Cassou, <i>Vingt-deux poémes,</i> 1978. Est: € 8,000
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>F. Schubert. Autograph letter to his brother Ferdinand, 4 pages, Zseliz, 1818. £80,000 to £120,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>L. v. Beethoven. Fine autograph letter to his librettist Friedrich Treitschke, about their planned opera, 1815. £70,000 to £90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Hermann Hesse, Highly important series of 62 letters and postcards to Stefan Zweig, 1903-1938. £60,000 to £80,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Reims, illuminated manuscript on vellum [France, late 15th century]. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Armenian gospel book, illuminated manuscript on vellum, seventeenth century, tooled calf binding. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>C. Goldoni. Ten autograph letters signed to the Genoese nobleman Cristoforo Spinola, Venice 1742-1743. £7,000 to £9,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>“The secret of life is in Art,”</i> autograph quotation dated and signed, 1882. Sold for $15,600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Manhattan Gay Scene Guide 1969, Summer Edition,</i> Mattachine Book Service. Sold for $3,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Toyen, pen & ink illustration from <i>Marquis de Sade: Justina cili prokletí ctnosti,</i> 1932. Sold for $26,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Antonio Lopez, 9 men’s fashion studies, graphite, 1974. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Harvey Milk, 2 autograph letters signed, to Pat Mormon, during US Navy service, 1954. Sold for $2,210.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Daniel Abraham, original art for <i>Stonewall Romances,</i> pen, ink & gouache, 1979. Sold for $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Untitled (Genet with Dog),</i> mixed media collage. Sold for $27,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Susie Gaynes & Amy E. Bartell, <i>March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights,</i> 1987. Sold for $1,188.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Paris is Burning,</i> photo offset poster by Anne Dutlinger, signed by film director Jennie Livingston, 1991. Sold for $1,500.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2015 Issue

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas Win a Momentary Victory in the Battle of the Alamo Library

8e31d0f4-afc9-4a0b-80d8-9830bedc895e

The Alamo Research Center (photo from the DRT website).

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas won at least a temporary victory over the Texas General Land Office in the Battle of the Alamo Library. The Daughters (DRT) operated the Alamo itself for over a century before being ousted by the state government. There was little they could do about it. The DAR raised the funds and purchased the then crumbling structure in 1905 to save it from destruction. However, they also turned over ownership of it to the state. The DRT then operated it on behalf of the State of Texas. When the state demanded it back, there was nothing they could do but acquiesce.

 

However, there is a separate structure on the property, once known as the DRT Library but now the Alamo Research Center. That, too, is owned by the state, but the collection within it is in dispute (see Second Battle). It consists of around 38,000 items, many pertaining to the Alamo but others related to Texas history in general. Both sides concede that the other owns some unspecified number of items within the collection, but the great majority are in dispute. Records may not exist for long ago gifts, or it may be unclear who the giver intended the recipient to be (presuming they even distinguished between the DRT and the State). Both sides claim ownership of these. The state has said, in effect, it owns everything the DRT cannot prove was specifically given to them, or purchased with funds not contributed by the state. The DRT says these items were handed over to them, not the state, and were received on behalf of the DRT.

 

With their lease on the building set to expire next July, the DRT began seeking a new home for the collection. In August, they said they found one, later revealed to be Texas A & M University-San Antonio. Perhaps the Land Office feared the Daughters would seek to sneak the disputed collection out in the night as one morning in August, workers arrived to find the library padlocked. According to the DRT, employees were informed they could retain their jobs but would be working for the state. The DRT also claimed their computer system had been hacked. The Daughters quickly headed off for the courtroom, where they obtained a temporary restraining order against the state.

 

Now, that preliminary matter has been adjudicated in court, with the DRT pleased with the results. They will continue to have complete access to the collection and be allowed to operate the library. That will continue until July 11, 2016, when their contract with the state expires. Meanwhile, a trial to resolve the bigger issue – who owns the collection – is set for February 22. This one could be reminiscent of the earlier Battle of the Alamo, when Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie and others fought to the death over possession of the Alamo. Maybe this won't be quite to the death, but the Daughters of the Republic of Texas probably hold Land Office officials in about as much esteem as the Texians did Santa Anna.

 

While technically unrelated to the earlier taking of the Alamo by the state, this action is undoubtedly an outgrowth. The DRT had dutifully maintained the historic building they had saved for over a century. However, Land Office officials believed it was not being kept up as well as it should be. Additionally, they wanted to improve Alamo Plaza, the historic district around the Alamo. Their belief was that significant upgrading of the entire experience of visiting the site was needed to satisfy modern tourists. The state, with access to tax dollars, has virtually unlimited funds. The DRT could only rely on donations and sales at the museum store. The kind of update desired by the state, which hired outside designers to come up with a new plan for the area, would be beyond the means of the DRT. Still, the change was hardly welcomed by the DRT and its supporters, even if they realized there was nothing they could do. The state certainly has the capacity to make Alamo Plaza a more desirable destination for tourists, and hopefully a greater teaching site, though we certainly hope they don't turn it into Alamoland in anticipation of turning it into a profitable venture.

 

The Daughters did recently receive a significant letter of endorsement from a group of archivists and academics, including former Texas state archivist David B. Gracy II. They said there was nothing in the DRT's operation of the library that suggests it needs to be taken over, while maintaining the Land Office does not have the expertise to manage the archives. They contended the Land Office's claim "would set an untenable precedent that would potentially impact the ownership of every Texas museum and library collection acquired through donations." It should be noted that not everyone shares this group's endorsement of the DRT's expertise and management of the library.

 

The DRT will find itself up against a powerful name in Texas and national politics when they go to trial next year – George Bush. No, this isn't the former President George Bush, nor the other former President George Bush. This is General Land Office Commissioner George P. Bush, grandson and nephew of the former Presidents. His dad, Jeb Bush, aspires to be the third President Bush, and if he makes it, many in Texas suspect George P. will seek to be the fourth President Bush. The man is influential. This is a worthy opponent, with the Daughters of the Republic hoping they don't end up like their Alamo forefathers.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 1st<br>Antique and modern prints,<br>drawings and paintings</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 2nd<br>Photographs, autographs, musical works and manuscripts</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Books from XV to XX Century</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Mathematics books</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Art books from Salvador Dalí<br>& others</b>
  • <center><b>Firsts Online Rare Book Fair<br> 27 November to 2 December<br><br> Presented by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association</b>
  • <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>Live Online<br>2 December 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Rackham (Arthur). 'The Skein', original pen, ink and watercolour drawing. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Vico (Giambattista). <i>Principj di una scienza nuova,</i> FIRST EDITION, Felice Mosca, Naples,1725. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> <i>Bauerkeller's New Embossed Plan of London,</i> first edition, Ackermann & Co., 1841. £1,800 to £2,200.
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>Live Online<br>2 December 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Bible, English, Coverdale's Version, J. Nycolson, Southwark, [1535]. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Johnson (Samuel). <i>A Dictionary of the English Langauge,</i> 2 vol., fourth edition revised by the author, folio, 1773. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Orwell (George). <i>The Road to Wigan Pier,</i> first public edition, 8vo., Victor Gollancz, 1937. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Rowling (J. K.) <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first printing 1997. £6,000 to £8,000.
  • <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>All-Negro Comics</i> Issue #1, 1947. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Early Memoir of a Black Hairdresser, 1859. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> First Edition <i>Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, An African,</i> 1782. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Bessie Coleman Aero News Vol. 1 Issue 1, May 1930, Signed by William J. Powell. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Book of Poetry and Music by Formerly Illiterate Author Thomas Young, 1897. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Cabinet Card of 24th Infantryman, Tombstone, Arizona Territory, circa 1882. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> James Baldwin Portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1955. $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>The Pacific Appeal</i> Newspaper, San Francisco, 1877. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Only Known Copy <i>Spreading Joy,</i> Uplift History of African Americans in Los Angeles, 1937. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1940 Los Angeles <i>The Official Central Avenue District Directory.</i> $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> GRÉGOIRE, Henri (French, 1750-1831). <i>An Enquiry Concerning the Intellectual and Moral Faculties, and Literature of Negroes,</i> First American Edition, 1810. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1893 Indian Territory Album with Images of Tacky Grayson. $4,000 to $6,000.

Article Search

Archived Articles

Ask Questions