• <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin and French Book of Hours, around 1490. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br> P. Goos, <i>Le Grand Miroir de la Mer,</i> 1669. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. Feininger, Letter with woodcuts, 1920. Est: € 25,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>Latin Bible manuscript, 12th century. Est: € 20,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. E. Bloch, <i>Naturgeschichte der Fische,</i> 1782-95. Est: € 40,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>M. Chagall, <i>Daphnis & Chloé,</i> 1961. Est: € 90,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>L. J. Waghenaer, <i>Speculum nauticum,</i> 1586. Est: € 180,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>P. J. de Pannemaeker, Collection of orig. watercolors, 1878-1887.<br>Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>G. Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> 1918.<br>Est: € 15,000
    <center><b>Ketterer Rare Books<br>Auction on November 30th</b>
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br><i>Livro dos prestimonios,</i> Manuscript, 1665. Est: € 25,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>W. Kandinsky, <i>Klänge,</i> 1913.<br>Est: € 18,000
    <b>Ketterer Rare Books, Nov. 30:</b><br>J. Miró in J. Cassou, <i>Vingt-deux poémes,</i> 1978. Est: € 8,000
  • <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>F. Schubert. Autograph letter to his brother Ferdinand, 4 pages, Zseliz, 1818. £80,000 to £120,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>L. v. Beethoven. Fine autograph letter to his librettist Friedrich Treitschke, about their planned opera, 1815. £70,000 to £90,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Hermann Hesse, Highly important series of 62 letters and postcards to Stefan Zweig, 1903-1938. £60,000 to £80,000.
    <center><b>Sotheby’s<br>Music, Continental Books<br>and Medieval Manuscripts<br>24 Nov. – 1 Dec. 2020<br>Online</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Book of Hours, Use of Reims, illuminated manuscript on vellum [France, late 15th century]. £40,000 to £60,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b> Armenian gospel book, illuminated manuscript on vellum, seventeenth century, tooled calf binding. £7,000 to £10,000.
    <b>Sotheby’s, 24 Nov. – 1 Dec.:</b><br>C. Goldoni. Ten autograph letters signed to the Genoese nobleman Cristoforo Spinola, Venice 1742-1743. £7,000 to £9,000.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Oscar Wilde, <i>“The secret of life is in Art,”</i> autograph quotation dated and signed, 1882. Sold for $15,600.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Manhattan Gay Scene Guide 1969, Summer Edition,</i> Mattachine Book Service. Sold for $3,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Toyen, pen & ink illustration from <i>Marquis de Sade: Justina cili prokletí ctnosti,</i> 1932. Sold for $26,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Antonio Lopez, 9 men’s fashion studies, graphite, 1974. Sold for $6,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Harvey Milk, 2 autograph letters signed, to Pat Mormon, during US Navy service, 1954. Sold for $2,210.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Daniel Abraham, original art for <i>Stonewall Romances,</i> pen, ink & gouache, 1979. Sold for $3,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> David Wojnarowicz, <i>Untitled (Genet with Dog),</i> mixed media collage. Sold for $27,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Susie Gaynes & Amy E. Bartell, <i>March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights,</i> 1987. Sold for $1,188.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> <i>Paris is Burning,</i> photo offset poster by Anne Dutlinger, signed by film director Jennie Livingston, 1991. Sold for $1,500.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2015 Issue

The British Library Rejects a Collection... For the Wrong Reason

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Taliban religious police beat woman on a Kabul street in 2001.

Libraries don't accept everything offered to them. Indeed, much of what is offered is declined, even though it may be of significant value. Storing and maintaining material in perpetuity is expensive, so unless the items are highly valuable, highly sought after, or appropriate to that library's particular collecting niche, the chances are good it will be declined. However, this was not the reason why the prestigious British Library recently turned down a large collection of material of high interest to scholars of current events that would have cost little to maintain.

 

The British Library was recently offered a large collection of material pertaining to the Taliban, the Afghan group run out of the government of Afghanistan a dozen years ago after the U.S. and allied invasion. Certainly, this is timely material, and valuable for those trying to understand the medieval mindset of this group and others that have had such a major impact on recent history. Even those who want to destroy these forces from the Dark Ages would surely agree that understanding how they think is essential to combating them. And, if the concern was maintaining the collection might be too expensive, it is a digital collection. A few gigabytes on a tiny, inexpensive chip should do the trick.

 

The concern here was legal, and perhaps a case where the law, or at least a perception of the law, has led to what appears to many to be a ridiculous conclusion. In their explanation for declining to host what is known as the Taliban Sources Project, the British Library cited the Terrorism Act. That act is designed to prevent British residents from supporting terrorist groups, and while the Taliban has not officially been so named, one could certainly come to the conclusion that they are such a group based on past behavior. In its brief explanation for refusing the collection, the British Library stated:

 

"In July 2015 curators from the British Library met with Thesigers, a consultancy that represents the Taliban Sources Project, to discuss whether the Library would be willing to acquire and give access to their large digitised archive.

 

"Although the archive was recognised as being of research value, it was judged that it contained some material which could contravene the Terrorism Act, and which would present restrictions on the Library’s ability to provide access to the archive for researchers.

 

"The Terrorism Act places specific responsibilities on anyone in the UK who might provide access to terrorist publications, and the legal advice received jointly by the British Library and other similar institutions advises against making this type of material accessible."

 

The Terrorism Act makes it illegal to disseminate material which could be used by a person committing or preparing for an act of terrorism, or to circulate terrorist publications. Perhaps that makes a circulating library uncomfortable. However, it also requires that the intention be to encourage terrorism or that the individual be reckless in promoting it. It is hard to imagine the British Library intends to promote terrorism or would be wantonly reckless by acting like a library.

 

What does the archive compiled by Thesigers, a London firm devoted to conducting research projects, contain? It houses official newspapers, maps, poems, radio broadcasts, laws and edicts promulgated by the Taliban. Most is from their time in power, mainly the 1990's. Much of the material has been translated to English so as to make it understandable to the average British Library visitor. It does not contain bomb making recipes and such. Heck, if you want that, you don't need to go a library. The internet will suffice.

 

Obviously, much of the material will state the Taliban point of view. They wrote the stuff. If you were inclined to their way of thinking, then you could be inspired by it. However, the same holds true for any other philosophy. Is the British Library no longer permitted to provide material teaching about the Nazis? Soviets? Red Chinese? Fascists? Genghis Khan? Ancient Romans, Greeks, or Egyptian Pharaohs? Heck, no need for the British to go so far afield. How about Henry VIII? He was a terrorist to his wives and various associates who had differing points of view. We Americans thought King George (III) was a terrorist during the Boston Massacre, Lexington and Concord, and various times thereafter. The Declaration of Independence is a litany of his "terrorist" activities.

 

Somewhere along the way, someone needs to exercise some common sense. A collection of material about a cause, no matter how terrible, made available under conditions set by a public library, is a necessary piece of scholarship. It is not a promotion of that cause, even though there is always some risk it will be misused. That is the price of freedom. It is hard to imagine that the stifling of understanding was the intent of the law, or that a state prosecutor would attempt to imprison their own librarians for disseminating knowledge. The outcry would be deafening. Better to have people sign in to read this stuff in a library than obtain it privately through the internet from those who seek to promote the cause, not explain it. It is important that we understand evil as well as good. As the philosopher George Santayana once observed, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 1st<br>Antique and modern prints,<br>drawings and paintings</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 2nd<br>Photographs, autographs, musical works and manuscripts</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Books from XV to XX Century</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Mathematics books</b>
    <b><center>Gonnelli<br>December 3rd<br>Art books from Salvador Dalí<br>& others</b>
  • <center><b>Firsts Online Rare Book Fair<br> 27 November to 2 December<br><br> Presented by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association</b>
  • <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>Live Online<br>2 December 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Rackham (Arthur). 'The Skein', original pen, ink and watercolour drawing. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Vico (Giambattista). <i>Principj di una scienza nuova,</i> FIRST EDITION, Felice Mosca, Naples,1725. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> <i>Bauerkeller's New Embossed Plan of London,</i> first edition, Ackermann & Co., 1841. £1,800 to £2,200.
    <center><b>Chiswick Auctions<br>Books & Works on Paper<br>Live Online<br>2 December 2020</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Bible, English, Coverdale's Version, J. Nycolson, Southwark, [1535]. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Johnson (Samuel). <i>A Dictionary of the English Langauge,</i> 2 vol., fourth edition revised by the author, folio, 1773. £800 to £1,200.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Orwell (George). <i>The Road to Wigan Pier,</i> first public edition, 8vo., Victor Gollancz, 1937. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Dec. 2:</b> Rowling (J. K.) <i>Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone,</i> FIRST EDITION, first printing 1997. £6,000 to £8,000.
  • <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>All-Negro Comics</i> Issue #1, 1947. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Early Memoir of a Black Hairdresser, 1859. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> First Edition <i>Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, An African,</i> 1782. $2,500 to $3,500.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Bessie Coleman Aero News Vol. 1 Issue 1, May 1930, Signed by William J. Powell. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Book of Poetry and Music by Formerly Illiterate Author Thomas Young, 1897. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Cabinet Card of 24th Infantryman, Tombstone, Arizona Territory, circa 1882. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> James Baldwin Portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1955. $3,500 to $4,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> <i>The Pacific Appeal</i> Newspaper, San Francisco, 1877. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> Only Known Copy <i>Spreading Joy,</i> Uplift History of African Americans in Los Angeles, 1937. $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b><center>Cowan’s Auctions<br>The Steve Turner Collection<br>of African Americana, Part II<br>December 3, 2020</b>
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1940 Los Angeles <i>The Official Central Avenue District Directory.</i> $2,000 to $3,000.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> GRÉGOIRE, Henri (French, 1750-1831). <i>An Enquiry Concerning the Intellectual and Moral Faculties, and Literature of Negroes,</i> First American Edition, 1810. $1,500 to $2,500.
    <b>Cowan’s, Dec 3:</b> 1893 Indian Territory Album with Images of Tacky Grayson. $4,000 to $6,000.

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