Rare Book Monthly

Articles - January - 2012 Issue

Internet Giants Amazon and eBay in a Tax War

Ebaysaleschart

A graph presented by eBay intended to show that it is large retailers, not sales taxes, that hurt.

Two internet behemoths, and two of the largest booksellers in the world, went at it in testimony before the House Judiciary Committee recently. The subject was the collection of out of state sales tax by internet retailers. And here is the surprising thing – each was focused not on their own business interests, but on those of you, the small bookseller or other merchant. You may have found them at times heavy handed and too quick to raise their fees, but on this issue, they are both fighting for you. Oddly, though, they reach totally different conclusions as to what is in your best interests. Those conclusions are as different as are their own personal interests. It's funny how things happen that way.

The issue is whether an online business must collect sales tax on items sold to out of state customers. Right now, the U.S. Constitution, as interpreted by the Supreme Court, says that a state can only require an out of state retailer to collect sales tax from customers within their state if that retailer has some connection to that state, like a store or warehouse located within its boundaries. However, that court has implied that if the federal government passed a law allowing states to demand out of state retailers collect a state's sales tax, regardless of whether they had any presence, then they could be forced to to do so. Naturally, most states would love to have the federal government pass such a law, as they could collect a lot more sales tax money that way. Many consumers probably disagree.

However, we will leave aside the interests of government and consumers, and instead, as Amazon and eBay did in their testimony, focus on the interests of booksellers and other retailers, big and small. Amazon came out strongly for a federal law requiring internet retailers to collect state sales taxes, counterintuitive to their long stonewalling of sales tax collection. Ebay came out just as strongly opposed.

Amazon's position is the more surprising. In his testimony, Amazon's Vice-President for Global Public Policy, Paul Misener, stated that the internet retailer has long supported such federal rules, and that may be the case. However, as states in the past have tried to get Amazon to collect their sales tax, no company has been more adamant in its refusal. The company has closed warehouses in Texas, let go “agents” in other states when those states asserted those were sufficient connections to force Amazon to collect their sales tax. In Tennessee, it demanded the state promise not to find a connection before it agreed to open warehouses and hire workers in that state. In California, up until a few weeks ago, Amazon threatened to put an initiative on the ballot to prevent state officials from requiring sales tax collections on out of state retailers on the basis of such connections. No one has played hardball like Amazon on this issue, so why are they now asking Congress to pass a law that would require them to collect sales tax?

Before attempting to answer this question, let's look at what Amazon said. Mr. Misener stated that passing such legislation would serve the purposes of “protecting states’ rights, addressing the states’ needs, and leveling the playing field for all sellers.” On that last concern, Mr. Misener repeated the argument that so-called “Main Street” retailers have been arguing for years – that they are at a disadvantage to online sellers because they must charge their customers sales tax while the online retailers do not. Tax-free prices are cheaper than taxed ones, hence a competitive advantage. “Fairness among sellers should be created and maintained. Sellers should compete on a level playing field,” Mr. Misener asserted. Then he added, “Congress should not exempt too many sellers from collection, for these sellers will obtain a lasting un-level playing field versus Main Street and other retailers.”

So, going back to the question why Amazon is doing this, many “Main Street” shops might be dubious of their motives. Main Street booksellers have long complained that Amazon was the epitome of the unlevel playing field, using their size and lack of overhead by not having a physical presence on Main Street to undercut and eventually drive them out of business. There has long been the refrain that Amazon, in effect, uses their stores as a showroom. Customers come in to look at the merchandise on Main Street, make their selection, and then go home and order the merchandise for less from Amazon.

Well, not to be suspicious, but behind Amazon's words, they may now see their self-interest coinciding with that of “Main Street” retailers. Amazon has opened up distribution centers in several states to reduce their costs, and they wish to open them in more. They have what may (or may not) be considered “agents” willing to support their site in every state. Meanwhile, the states are pursuing them more aggressively than ever before. Just a few weeks back, Amazon threw in the towel in its dispute with California and agreed to begin collecting California sales tax next September. California has Amazon's largest customer base, and they want to be able to open warehouses close to their customers. The changing situation is forcing Amazon to collect sales taxes in more and more locations, in effect putting them at a competitive disadvantage to smaller internet retailers with a location in just one state. They are starting to feel the pain “Main Street” merchants have felt for years.


Posted On: 2012-01-01 00:00
User Name: George5133

As far as BUYING/SAVING $ and EBAY goes, forget the stock and use the website.

Use a site like Ebuyersedge.com to set up saved searches. You


Posted On: 2012-01-01 00:00
User Name: PhilipCohen

What possible purpose can a 300 character limitation on comments serve? You could add an extra nought. ...


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: xcergy

Excellent article. Thanks for posting.


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

I'm not an American, and find the idea of going into a shop and paying more than the advertised price insulting and from a Briton's point of


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

We only do that kind of thing in businesses aimed at selling to other businesses, who can offset the tax against taxes collected on their ow


Posted On: 2012-01-02 00:00
User Name: PeterReynolds

What might benefit America as a whole is if they exempted all businesses with less than $150,000 sales from charging sales tax. Think of al


Posted On: 2012-01-07 00:00
User Name: PhilipCohen

Most interesting article. But, still no comments of any consequence. Is no one else visiting this site, or is it simply that detailed negative


Rare Book Monthly

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    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. COCKERELL, Sydney C. <i>Some German Woodcuts of the Fifteenth Century.</i> Hammersmith: The Kelmscott Press, 1897 [issued 1898]. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [GOLDEN COCKEREL PRESS]. KEATS, John. <i>Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of Saint Agnes and Other Poems.</i> Waltham Saint Lawrence, Berkshire: The Golden Cockerel Press, 1928. $6,000 to $8,000
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    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [GRANT, Ulysses S.— GRANT, Julia, First Lady]. Carved Applewood and 18-karat Gold Jewelry Suite, Browne & Spaulding, Jewelers, New York City, 1865. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [LINCOLN ASSASSINATION]. GARDNER, Alexander. <i>Incidents of the War |Sic Semper Sicariis</i> [caption title]. Washington, D. C.: Philip & Solomons, 1865. $5,000 to $7,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> A COMPLETE COLLECTION of 115 titles published in R. R. Donnelley's Lakeside Classics series. Chicago, 1903-2017. COMPLETE RUN OF THE LONGEST-RUNNING CONTINUOUS SERIES OF BOOKS IN THE WORLD. $5,000 to $7,000
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    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> GLEIZES, Albert. METZINGER, Jean. <i>Du Cubisme.</i> Paris, 1947. LIMITED EDITION, number 19 of 20 copies on papier d'Auvergne. $3,000 to $4,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [THE LITTLE REVIEW]. ANDERSON, Margaret, ed. POUND, Ezra, ed. HEAP, Jane, ed. <i>The Little Review.</i> Vol. I, No. 1 through Vol. XII, No. 2. 1914-1929. $3,000 to $4,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [MOUNTENEY, Leonard, binder]. LOUŸS, Pierre. <i>Songs of Bilitis.</i> Chicago: Argus Books, 1931. $2,000 to $3,000
    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 6:</b> [HANCOCK, John]. Partly-printed U.S. Loan-Office Transfer Certificate issued on behalf of Hancock. Sgn’d on recto by William Imlay, as Commissioner of Loans of Connecticut. 28 February 1793. $2,000 to $3,000
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    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DUPRÉ, LOUIS. 1789-1837. <i>Voyage à Athènes et à Constantinople, ou Collection de portraits, vues et costumes grecs et ottomans.</i> Paris: Dondey-Dupré, 1825. $60,000 to $90,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ADAMS, JOHN. Autograph Letter Signed ("J Adams"), [to Dr. Perkins?] while recovering from his small pox inoculation, [late-April, 1764]. $30,000 to $50,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUSTEN, JANE. Autograph Letter Signed ("J. Austen"), to her sister Cassandra, 4 pp, "Thursday – after dinner," [September 16, 1813,] Henrietta St. $80,000 to $120,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> AUDUBON, JOHN JAMES. 1785-1851. <i>The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories.</i> New York & Philadelphia: J.J. Audubon & J.B. Chevalier, 1840-1844. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DODWELL, EDWARD. 1767-1832. <i>Views in Greece.</i> London: Rodwell and Martin, 1821. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> JAMES, JESSE. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jesse W. James"), to Mr. Flood demanding Flood retract spurious accusations, 3 pp, June 5, 1875. $200,000 to $300,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> DE CORDOBA, JACOB. <i>Map of the State of Texas.</i> New York, 1866. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> ARNOLD, BENEDICT. Autograph bookseller's receipt for Dr. John Dickinson, Signed ("B. Arnold"), February 1767. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> EINSTEIN, ALBERT. 4 Typed Letters Signed ("A Einstein") to Cleveland E. Dodge offering early reports on the meetings of the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> EISENHOWER, DWIGHT D. Typed Letter Signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower") to General Henri Giraud written from a secret bunker in Gibraltar on the eve of Operation Torch, November 4 [but 6], 1942. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Bonhams, Oct. 23:</b> Early Broadside Printing of the GADSDEN PURCHASE, Puebla, August 16, 1854. $2,000 to $3,000.
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    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 5:</b> DARWIN, Charles. <i>On the Origin of Species.</i> London John Murray, 1859. FIRST EDITION. THE VERY FINE MELLON-GARDEN COPY. $120,000 to $180,000
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    <b>Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Nov. 5:</b> EUCLID. <i>Elementa geometriae.</i> Translated from the Arabic by Adelard of Bath. Venice: Erhard Ratdolt, 25 May 1482. FIRST EDITION. $60,000 to $80,000
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