• <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 372: Martin Luther King Jr. March for Freedom Now! Placard. Chicago, 1960. 28 x 22”. $3,000 to $6,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 567: Warhol, Andy. Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet, Signed on the Cover by Warhol. Tate Gallery, 1971. $700 to $900
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 72: Mitchell, Margaret. <i>Gone With the Wind.</i> New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. First edition, first issue. $4,000 to $5,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 468: Photo Archive Documenting the 1930s—50s Chicago Jazz and Night Club Scene. A significant collection. $2,000 to $4,000
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 143: Dr. Seuss. <i>Oh Say Can You Say.</i> 1979, First Edition, Signed. $200 to $300
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 285: [Maps] Thomas G. Bradford. <i>A Comprehensive Atlas, Geographical, Historical & Commercial.</i> Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. First Edition. $1,600 to $1,800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 69: Herman Melville. <i>Moby Dick, or The Whale</i>. New York: Random House, 1930. First Kent Trade Edition. $400 to $600
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 295: John James Audoban. Group of 148 Lithographs from the Birds of America. Philadelphia: J.T. Bowen, ca. 1840s. $600 to $800
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 54: Langston Hughes. <i>One-Way Ticket.</i> New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1949. First edition. $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions: Fine Books & Manuscripts. July 28, 2018</b>
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 7: Ray Bradbury. <i>The Martian Chronicles.</i> With a Wine Label Signed by Bradbury. Garden City: Doubleday, 1950. First edition $300 to $500
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 121. Frank L Baum. <i>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.</i> Chicago: George M. Hill Co., 1899, 1900. First Edition. $4,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Potter & Potter Auctions, July. 28:</b> Lot 369. [Declaration of Independence] Peter Force Engraving of the Declaration of Independence. One page; 29 x 26”. From the "American Archives" 1837-1853 series of books. $15,000 to $20,000
  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. <i>The Tragedie of Julius Caesar.</i> London, 1623. 1st appearance in print, Complete from the First Folio. Sold for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Cranmer, Thomas (1489-1556). <i>Catechismus, That is to Say, a Shorte Instruction into Christian Religion...</i> London, 1548. First edition. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Donne, John (1572-1631). <i>Pseudo-Martyr.</i> London: Printed by W[illiam] Stansby for Walter Burre, 1610. First edition. $25,000 to $35,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Fletcher, Giles (1549?-1611). <i>The Russe Common Wealth, or Maner of Gouernement by the Russe Emperour…</i> London, 1591. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Gabelkover, Oswald (1539-1616). <i>The Boock of Physicke.</i> Dordrecht: Isaack Caen, 1599. First edition. $12,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner: Early English Books<br>A Single Owner Sale. July 20, 2018</b>
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Galileo, Galilei (1564-1642) trans. Thomas Salusbury (d. 1666). <i>Mathematical Collections and Translations the First Tome.</i> London, 1661. First edition of Galileo's works in English. $35,000 to $50,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Higden, Ranulphus (d. 1364). <i>Polycronicon.</i> Translated by John Trevisa, with the 1357-1460 <i>Continuation</i> by William Caxton. Southwark, 1527. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> Randolph, Bernard (b. 1643). <i>The Present State of the Morea, Called Anciently Peloponnesus…</i> London, 1689. [Bound with] <i>The Present State of the Islands of the Archipelago…</i> $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Skinner, July 20:</b> <i>The Great Herball Newly Corrected.</i> London, 1539. Folio, ESTC lists three U.S. copies; the last copy offered at auction was incomplete and sold in 1949. $25,000 to $35,000

Rare Book Monthly

Book Catalogue Reviews - November - 2017 Issue

Eighteenth and 19th Century Correspondence from Read 'Em Again Books

0d663e30-7018-40ec-8db9-166e2ff02866

With pen in hand...

Read 'Em Again Books has issued a catalogue with a poetic title, With pen in hand, I sit to write. The subheading explains that title more clearly – A Collection of 18th and 19th Century Correspondence. While Read 'Em Again is a bookseller, this catalogue is devoted mainly to manuscript correspondence. While in the book business, they explain, "most of those who buy from us don't consider themselves to be book collectors even though they may often buy collectible books. Rather...they are thematic collectors – perhaps they collect topics related to their employment, a hobby, an institution, an interest, a region, a historical period, or even their family." It is an evolution in traditional collecting we see more and more today. Read 'Em Again Books is at the forefront of current trends.

 

There is one other point to note about many of these letters. They will also appeal to philatelic collectors. Those who engage in philately will know what that means. For others, it is stamp collecting. Most of these letters come with their original mailing envelopes and stamps. Due to their dates, that means these are early stamps. Undoubtedly, these stamps add to the value, but not knowing philately, I cannot say on each item whether it is a significant or a small part of the overall value. We will note that Read 'Em Again is not only a member of major book organizations, the ABAA and ILAB, but of the American Philatelic Society and the National Stamp Dealers Association. Now, here are a few selections from this collection.

 

We begin with a letter in a rare early advertising envelope for one of today's most famous American companies. It wasn't then. The corporate return address is for Asa G. Candler & Co., Wholesale Druggists in Atlanta Georgia. That name isn't familiar, but they had a proprietary product whose name you will recognize – Coca Cola. The back of the envelope proclaims, "The Brain Tonic and Intellectual Soda Fountain Beverage, Coca-Cola, Recommended by all who have used it." The "Coca-Cola" is in large type, in the familiar script still seen today. Inside, is a four-page letter from "Willie," dated October 5, 1889. Coca Cola was invented by John Pemberton in 1886, replete with its magic ingredient. He sold rights to his tonic to Asa Candler in May, 1889, and the rest is history. Willie writes his letter to "sis," which may be a nickname for his wife, that "Mr. Candler made me an offer of $50 for the month... What do you think of my taking this position?" Take it, Willie! Actually, he already did. The offer was not in the Coke department, but he was put in charge of retail and prescriptions. As to whether Willie's career grew with Candler's success or he moved on we do not know. Item 54. Priced at $3,000.

 

Next we have a letter from Captain "Indian" Van Swearingen from his fort near Wellsburg, Virginia (now West Virginia) to his cousin Captain Josiah Swearingen. Van Swearingen fought in the Revolution, and later traded with and fought against Indians. His adventures on the frontier led him to be close friends with the famous, or infamous, younger Indian fighter Samuel Brady. Brady had several family members killed by Indians and devoted his life to exacting revenge. Brady was welcome in Swearingen's house, which led to his eloping with the older man's daughter, Drusilla. All would be forgiven. In 1791, Brady followed some marauding Indians across the border of Pennsylvania. While there, he killed four natives Delaware who were not involved. Brady was tried, but there was no way anyone was going to be convicted of killing Indians, innocent or not, on the frontier. He was acquitted. Van Swearingen's letter refers to these events at the time they were occurring. Writes Swearingen, "I am agoing to give you the late nuse...the Indens latly killd & took seven people 2 mils from my Fort & fore others in the woods... Brady & others 25 folowd or souted after the Savedges – returnd with 4 skilps & a grate quantity of plunder." He goes on to say, "we expect a bludy general Savedg War & Should expect you in the feald if you was as capabl as you was when you was back by Rascall & Macintosh..." Swearingen composed this letter before the invention of spell check. Item 1. $4,500.

 

Going off to school was a bit more of a challenge back in 1849. This young lady was traveling from her home in Deerfield, New Hampshire, to the Ontario Female Seminary in Canandaigua, New York. It's 400 miles away, and according to Google Maps, takes about 6 ½ hours to reach. It took Abby Wells eight days. She left on a Friday, probably December 30, 1848, accompanied by her brother, David, for the first part of the journey. They had to go by stage to Albany, at which point she could pick up a train the rest of the way. She left Milford Friday morning but did not make it to Boxborough until 10:30 at night. Heavy snow fell and the men had to get out of the stage and help clear the way. They spent several days trapped, and once they began moving again, were only able to travel 15 miles in a day. They finally reached Albany Thursday night. David then returned home, and we don't know how long that took, while Abby took the train west Friday morning. The train finally arrived in Canandaigua Saturday morning, 24 hours later. Abby was undaunted. She writes her parents on January 10, "I should not be afraid to return alone if necessary. I did not suffer scarcely any with the cold excepting my feet..." As a postscript, Read 'Em Again tells us Abby later returned to Deerfield, taught in the local school until about the age of 60, did not marry, and died in 1887. The envelope was mailed with a black 10 cent Washington stamp. Item 23. $1,750.

 

When your husband is wounded on a Civil War battlefield hundreds of miles away, it isn't easy to be cheered up, but E. T. Lamerburton made a great effort to amuse his buddy's wife in this December 5, 1862 letter. Lamerburton is handling the correspondence evidently because Augusta's husband was not up to writing. The letter was written from "Camp Vermont" in Virginia to the following address: "This letter is for Augusta Wife of H.W.C.. the Vt. soldier who was shot on Picket near the Po-to-mac Daughter of Capt. King. In keeping of the Doctor. Snow's Store, Vermont." Augusta's husband's friend humorously writes, "You don't seem to answer my letters very well...if you can't do better, jist copy off a verse or two of scripture – or anything else." He then adds, reassuringly, "Your man is doing splendidly. The Surgeon dressed the wound day before yesterday, and said it looked much better than he thought it would." Continuing in a positive vein, he adds, "Our huts are as warm and dry as need be, and we five fellows are having an uproarious time - that is we are happy and jolly." One suspects he is exaggerating to comfort her. While Augusta must not have been much at writing, Lamerburton acknowledges that the cigars and cheese she sent arrived, adding, "...as far as I am concerned, if the girls were only here, soldiering wouldn't be at all hard to take." Item 37. $300.

 

J. N. Embres had concerns other than the mere risk of the loss of a spouse during the Civil War. He was worried about the loss of slaves. Embres wrote to Josiah Nichols in Washington, Arkansas, on January 25, 1864. He writes of "...2 Negro Boys that were stolen from Maj. John Easton & a girl from Mrs. Williams." He continues, "The thieves are about here & I have no doubt the negroes will all be lost." He says "the girl is gone now," but the "Boys of Easton are on this side of the River & placed with some woman who is instructed to keep them as her own..." To put this in context, these were not cases of people stealing slaves for their labor. There was evidently an active underground railroad even in Confederate Arkansas at the time. The "River" Embres refers to is the Ouachita, and the fear of the slaves crossing that river was because Union troops controlled the other side. Item 44. $1,500.

 

Read 'Em Again Books may be reached at 703-580-6946 or info@read-em-again.com. Their website is read-em-again.com.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.
  • <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Zane Grey, Inscribed photograph album depicting Grey and party at Catalina, fishing, and in Arizona. $700 to $1,000
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Eric Taverner, Salmon Fishing...London: Seeley, Service & Co., 1931. $600 to $900
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> The Gentleman Angler. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Ken Robinson, Flyfishers' Progress. [London: The Flyfishers' Club, 2000. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> G. H. Lacy, North Punjab Fishing Club Angler's Handbook. Calcutta: Newman & Co., 1890. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> J. Harrington Keene, Fly-Fishing and Fly-Making for Trout, etc. New York, 1887. $200 to $300
    <b>Doyle, online only: Angling Books from the Collection of Arnold "Jake" Johnson. July 13-24, 2018</b>
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Arthur Macrate, The History of The Tuna Club, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, California, 1948. $400 to $600
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Joseph D. Bates Jr. Streamer Fly Tying and Fishing. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company, 1966. $800 to $1,200
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Paul Schmookler and Ingrid V. Sils. Rare and Unusual Fly Tying Materials: A Natural History. $300 to $500
    <b>Doyle, online only Jul 13-24:</b> Herbert Hoover, Fishing For Fun - And To Wash Your Soul. New York: Random House, 1963. $400 to $600

Review Search

Archived Reviews

Ask Questions