Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2017 Issue

Scientist Pleads Guilty to Defrauding Government of Half a Million Dollars to Buy Books

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Daniel M. Alongi (photo from ResearchGate).

An Australian scientist with a long resume of published works has pleaded guilty to defrauding the government of over half a million Australian dollars, primarily to purchase books. Dr. Daniel Michael Alongi, an American native who obtained his undergraduate degree at City College of New York, and his Ph. D. from the University of Georgia, has worked in Australia since 1985. From 1985-2015, when he was suspended pending resolution of the charges, he was employed by the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences. It was there that he issued numerous false claims for reimbursement of funds for non-existent purchases.

 

Dr. Alongi has an extensive number of publications according to his ResearchGate page – 186 in all. He also has a long number of false claims for reimbursement of purchases on his resume according to the Townsville District Court – 129 of them. Along with about $50,000 Australian of legitimate claims, there were 129 false ones totaling $553,420 (or about $450,000 in U.S. dollars). Dr. Alongi was paid around $100,000 per year in salary, but this was insufficient to cover his appetite for books. Some will understand the appetite if not the means of satisfying it.

 

According to the prosecutor, Alongi created or modified invoices, credit card statements, receipts and the like. He forged the signature of his supervisor a minimum of 25 times. It was evidently her recognizing the forged signatures of her name that led to Alongi's arrest.

 

Judge Kiernan Dorney explained that he used the money to buy rare books, making many purchases on Amazon. One was a $15,000 purchase of one of the accounts of 18th century explorer James Cook, the most famous seafaring explorer of Australia and the Pacific. Still, the precise motivation of Alongi is hard to fathom. He was not selling the books for profit or to launder the fraudulently obtained funds. Nor was he a collector in the sense of being truly passionate about rare books, the classic bibliophile. According to the Townsville Bulletin, Judge Dorney offered the following hard-to-understand observation about the defendant - "What he bought was things that he did not need. It wasn’t an addiction such as gambling, or spending on his own lifestyle, it seemed to be bizarre things — I think you could say ridiculous things." We presume that the Judge meant that stealing money to purchase books, considering Alongi's unclear interest in them, was ridiculous, not that books in themselves are ridiculous things.

 

Defense attorney Justin Greggary had his own explanation for Alongi's strange behavior. He provided the court with a psychiatric report saying the defendant suffered from bipolar disorder. According to that report, the condition caused Dr. Alongi, during manic times, to go on "unrestrained buying sprees." Finally, we have a "scientific" explanation for bibliomania. That diagnosis notwithstanding, the Judge sentenced Alongi to 3 ½ years in prison, though he will be eligible for parole in six months. He had previously paid back the misappropriated funds from his pension account, in which the 60-year-old scientist had accumulated $900,000.

 

This unfortunate case did bring out a chorus of "I told you so's," though not from the usual list of suspects, such as people who think the government wastes money, those who think we are too soft on crime, nor even spouses of book collectors. Instead, it brought out many responses from climate change deniers. Alongi specialized in coastal environments, reefs, mangroves, and the climate of the area. Like most scientists, he concluded from his observations that the climate was changing. For the deniers, Alongi's fraudulent billing of the government represented convincing evidence that climate change is also a fraud. It was as if a finding that Galileo embezzled government funds proved the sun revolves around the earth after all. It's a strange argument, but as any climatologist will tell you, any port in a storm.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:<br>Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Caius Julius Hyginus, <i>Poeticon Astronomicon,</i> first illustrated edition, Venice, 1482. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Giovanni Botero, <i>Le Relationi Universali... divise in Sette Parti</i>, Venice, 1618. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> <i>L'Escole des Filles</i>, likely third edition of the first work of pornographic fiction in French, 1676. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:<br>Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Illuminated Book of Hours in Latin on vellum, Flanders, early 16th century. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Johannes Regiomontanus, <i>Calendarium,</i> Venice, 1485. $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Pedro de Medina, <i>Libro d[e] gra[n]dezas y cosas memorables de España,</i> Alcalá de Henares, 1566. $3,000 to $5,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:<br>Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b><br>Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> Salamanca, circa 1496-97. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Andrés Serrano, <i>Los Siete Principes de los Ángeles, válidos de Rey del Cielo,</i> Spain, 1707. $800 to $1,200.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Mar 8:</b> Johannes de Sacrobosco, <i>Sphaera mundi,</i> first illustrated edition, Venice, 1478. $15,000 to $20,000.
  • <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> A Rare 3-rotor German Enigma I Enciphering Machine. $70,000 to $90,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Important collection of correspondence between Werner Heisenberg and Bruno Rossi. $40,000 to $60,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Walt Whitman Autograph manuscript containing his thoughts on death. $20,000 to $30,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> David Roberts. <i>Holy Land</i>. Six volumes. 1842-1849. First edition. $15,000 to $25,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Extensive collection of Ray Bradbury's primary works, most signed or inscribed. $15,000 to $20,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Peter Force. Declaration of Independence. $12,000 to $18,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Steinbeck. <i>Grapes of Wrath</i>. A fine copy of the first edition. $10,000 to $15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Lewis & Clark. <i>Travels to the Source of the Missouri River</i>... First English edition, extra-illustrated. 1814. $10,000 to 15,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> Manuscript document signed by Nuno de Guzman relating to Hernan Cortes, 1528. $8,000 to $12,000
    <b>Bonhams, Feb. 11:</b> “Nos los inquisidores..." The first book in English printed West of the Mississippi. [1787]. $5,000 to $8,000.
  • <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Collection of 131 Herbert Ponting gelatin silver contact prints of Antartica, £6000-8000
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> One of several lots of Henri Cartier-Bresson gelatin silver prints, £200-300
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Vintage gelatin silver print of Diego Rivera by Leonard McCombe, £300-500
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Albumen print portrait by Julia Margaret Cameron of Sir John Herschel (April, 1867), £30,000-50,000
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Albumen print by Julia Margaret Cameron, Love, 1864 (from the Norman album), £1000-1500
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Albumen print by Lewis Carroll of Twyford School Eleven (Summer Term, 1859), £1000-1500
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Albumen print portrait by Lewis Carroll of Xie Kitchin as 'Dane' (Oxford, 1873), £500-800
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Calotype print (c1845) by Hill & Adamson of Lady Elizabeth (Rigby) Eastlake, £3000-4000
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Group of 12 waxed paper negatives of Scottish scenes by Thomas Keith, mid-1850s, £3000-5000
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> One of 15 lots of Roger Fenton salt prints of his work in the Crimea, mid-1850s, £400-600
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Quarter plate ambrotype (c.1860s) with ethnographic portrait of a woman seated at a table, £400-600
    <b>Dominic Winter, March 9:</b> Rare whole plate thermoplastic union case of the Landing of Columbus (c.1858),part of the John Hannavy collection, £1500-2000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>

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