• <b>Sotheby’s Paris: Books & Manuscripts. 30 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> MARCEL PROUST. Du côté de chez Swann. Grasset, 1913. First edition. One of 5 copies on Japan paper, inscribed by the author to Louis Brun. Est. €400,000 - 600,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Saint-Exupéry. <i>25 Autograph Illustrated Letters to his Friend Charles Sallès</i>. Est. €30,000-50,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> French Revolution, 1793. Déclaration des droits de l’Homme. 2,55 x 1,30m. A monumental wallpaper poster of the 1793 version, with hand-colored highlights. Unique copy. Est. €100,000 - 150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> GIAMBATTISTA PIRANESI. <i>Vedute di Roma</i>, 1748-1775. 107 etchings. An exceptional copy, printed and bound before 1780. Est. €50,000 - 80,000
    <b>Sotheby’s Paris, Oct. 30:</b> Picasso, Pablo -- Fernando de Rojas. LA CÉLESTINE. [PARIS, EDITIONS DE L'ATELIER CROMMELYNCK, 1971.] One of the 30 copies hors commerce (n° X). 66 original etchings by Picasso. Signed. Est. €30,000 - €35,000
  • <b>Announcing a new Books for Sale platform hosted by Biblio!</b>
    <b>List your books simultaneously on Rare Book Hub and Biblio!</b>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br><i>The Centenary Edition of the Works of Ian Fleming</i>, one of 26 lettered sets, 18 volumes, London, 2008. $25,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> William Faulkner, <i>The Marble Faun</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to Dorothy Wilcox by Faulkner & Phil Stone, Boston, 1924. $18,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Maurice Sendak, <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>, first edition, signed & inscribed to William Archibald, New York, 1963. $10,000 to $15,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anne Frank, <i>Het Achterhuis</i>, first edition, in first state jacket, Amsterdam, 1947. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Roald Dahl, <i>Charlie and the Chocolate Factory</i>, first edition, signed, New York, 1964. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b><br>Ray Bradbury, <i>Fahrenheit 451</i>, first limited edition bound in Johns-Manville Quinterra, New York, 1953. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Benjamin Graham, <i>The Intelligent Investor</i>, first edition, in original dust jacket, New York, 1949. $4,500 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Anna Sewell, <i>Black Beauty</i>, first edition, inscribed, London, 1877. $7,000 to $10,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Arthur Conan Doyle, <i>A Study in Scarlet</i>, first American edition, Philadelphia, 1890. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14: 19th & 20th Century Literature</b>
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> James Fenimore Cooper, <i>The Last of the Mohicans</i>, first edition, two volumes, Philadelphia, 1826. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Amelia Earhart, <i>20 hrs. 40 mins. Our Flight in Friendship</i>, limited first edition, signed, New York, 1928. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Nov 14:</b> Philip K. Dick, <i>World of Chance</i>, first edition, signed, London, 1956. $3,000 to $4,000.
  • <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Beethoven, Ludwig van. Autograph Manuscript of the Canon "Ewig Dein" Woo 161, signed at the end ("...[Ewig] Dein...Freund Ludwig Van Beethowen"). Est. £120,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Brahms, Johannes. Autograph Manuscript of the "Geistliches Wiegenlied", Op.91 No.2, for Contralto, Viola And Piano, the original version of 1864, signed and inscribed at the end by the composer. Est. £200,000 to £250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Chopin, Frédéric. Autograph Manuscript of the Opening of the Étude Op.25 No.2, in A-Flat Major, signed and dated ("Paris Ce 28 Avril F. Chopin"). Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London: Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection. Part I: Music. 26 October 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Haydn, Joseph. Autograph Letter Signed ("Jos Haydn[Paraph]"), to the Baden Choirmaster Anton Stoll, 30 July 1802. Est. £20,000 to £30,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Autograph Working Manuscript of a scene from Ernani. Est. £100,000 to £150,000
    <b>Sotheby’s London Oct 26:</b> Verdi, Giuseppe. Highly Important Series of Thirty-Six Autograph Letters Signed to The Librettist Salvadore Cammarano, written between 1844 And 1851, the greater part unpublished and unrecorded. Est. £250,000 to £300,000

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - October - 2017 Issue

Nancy Pearl & the Pursuit of Bookish Things

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Nancy Pearl, 72, bookseller, librarian, reviewer and model for the Nancy Pearl Librarian Action Figure has just published her first novel: George & Lizzie.

There’s not much in the world of bookish pursuits that Nancy Pearl hasn’t tried. She’s been a Tulsa bookseller, a Seattle librarian, a highly regarded book reviewer with regular guest appearances on NPR, the author of four volumes in the Book Lust series of recommended reading. She also interviews authors on television and is possibly the only librarian to have her own collectible action figure - a little plastic doll that makes a “Shushing motion…..” 

 

This September, at age 72, she added another string to the bow with the publication of her debut novel George & Lizzie ($25, Touchstone-Simon & Schuster).

 

When I first met Nancy Pearl she was still Nancy Linn, a student at Cass Tech High School in Detroit. My brother was her classmate; he brought her to our house where she was soon recruited by my mother to work in the book mines at the Cellar Book Shop (the Motor City’s only upstairs ABAA shop specializing in the Philippines and Southeast Asia), a job she did well and held for many years.

 

We all knew Nancy was destined for bigger things. Now, more than 50 years later, it’s a pleasure to look back on her career and see where she thinks the written word is headed. In her opinion, “The global rise of the Internet changed everything, not only books and the book business, it truly changed the way we live. I’m not a Luddite," she said, "I love what technology can do, and I have 13,000 followers on Twitter." Though she loves what it can do in libraries, she fears the end result of all that new technology is a certain shallowness, superficiality and isolating effect.

 

To be candid she’s worried about the future of libraries and reading: “When the Internet tsunami first hit, libraries didn’t know how to deal with it. The reaction was primarily consternation and the discussion was what role we would have now that the Internet could answer any ‘ready reference’ questions."

 

"Would it be the role of librarians to point out which are reliable sites? Turns out nobody knew and in the fullness of time nobody cares. The amazing and fascinating world of technology took over the libraries and crowded out the other services.”

 

She sees libraries as the heart of the community. "There are other ways to access computers and other venues for programs and discussions. Only the library provides both information and enrichment. But,” she said, "that is not seen as a primary function any longer.”



A longtime library professional she is a 1967 graduate of the University of Michigan with a degree in Library Science. She received her MA in history from Oklahoma State University in 1977. She lived 22 years in Oklahoma, fifteen of those in Tulsa.

 

In the beginning she worked at Yorktown Alley Bookstore in Tulsa, which was an independent shop selling new books. "As the lead bookseller it gave me an opportunity to talk with and sell books to many people." Though the store has since closed she termed it “a pretty great experience."

 

From there she went went back to library work in the Tulsa City-County system. Her career as a reviewer began at the Tulsa World, a daily paper and expanded when Tulsa public radio station KWGS requested her to come on and talk about books, which she did with enthusiasm from 1989 to 1993

 

Moving to the state of  Washington Pearl worked as director of the Washington Center for the Book at Seattle Public Library from 1993 to 2004. Her radio career continued when the program director in Tulsa sent a tape to the program director at Seattle’s KUOW public radio, urging the station “to have her on live …. she has no fear….”

 

"All I can say," said Nancy, "is it sold a lot books.”

 

She’s does not recall exactly how she made the transition from the Seattle airwaves to NPR’s Morning Edition, where she chats with host Steve Inskeep on a regular basis. In her ongoing role as a radio reviewer of current writing and TV interviewer of living authors she estimates she read thousands of books.

 

As for money, well money is not a big part of the Nancy Pearl equation. For example, she recalled, “When I left the bookstore in Tulsa to work for the library, it paid less than the bookstore." Presently she is semi-retired, though she continues to review, interview, host workshops and most recently write a novel.

 

Nancy Pearl - writer of fiction was not a premeditated action.

 

"A few years ago," she said, "two characters appeared in my head. I knew their names and where they met, but nothing else. In the next five years they stuck with me and I gradually came to know them. I wrote it in my head first."

 

"It was not on my list to write a novel. One day when I couldn’t find just the right book, I thought, 'Well, I could write it down, and it would be exactly the kind of book I'd want to read.'”

 

The checklist for "exactly the kind of book I'd like to read" includes quirky characters and healthy doses of book references, poetry, football and prickly people. Working with editor Tara Parsons it took two years to get it from her head to down on paper.

 

The story, set largely in Ann Arbor, is told through the eyes of a young Jewish woman in her 30s. But, Nancy said, "None of it is autobiographical, it’s all fiction." Her writing style is not straightforward, there’s much back and forth, many back stories and minor characters, "but that is my voice, the older and wiser, narrator, that's me,” she said. “I even got to record an audio book."

 

On the market for less than a month, most of the reviews are positive. Her publisher is pleased, she herself characterizes it as "not an excessively commercial book."

 

Though she's met many authors on book tours, she found her own promo schedule “exhausting - really exhausting.” Her September events included stops and talks in Oregon, California, Wisconsin, up and down the East Coast and of course, a visit to Tulsa.

 

"Right now I’m just catching up on my sleep. It was wonderful: wonderful libraries, bookstores, great people. I pride myself on the ability to rise to the occasion, but I must say right now I’m pretty tired." From October 3 to November 17 she goes back on the road promoting George & Lizzie with stops in Michigan, Virginia, Ohio and Washington.

 

As for another book? “I’m not so sure. I want to enjoy this. There will be a paperback edition next year. I like hearing from readers. I love talking about books and sharing."

 

Commenting on the 'Nancy Pearl - Librarian Action Figure' she noted that “it’s been discontinued, but rumor is there may be a new and different one, equally fabulous, plastic and 5” tall."

 

There’s no more shushing, this one is fighting against censorship.”

 

Though she is presently recovering from the rigors of travel, she has no intentions of scaling back. "Over the years I've traveled abroad talking to kids in other countries about books and reading. It’s arranged through the U.S. embassies, I go myself in person. I’ve been to Estonia, Bosnia, Vietnam, Cambodia -- I’d love to do more of that."

 

Sounds like a full plate, but Nancy Pearl has grander ambitions, potential sponsors please note: “I would love to do a barnstorming tour on foot -- to walk across the country and raise money for small and rural libraries.”

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Exodus 10:10 to 16:15. Complete Biblical scroll sheet in Hebrew, a Torah scroll panel. Middle East, ca. 10th or 11th century.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Copernicus Refuted. (Astronomy.). Scientific manuscript of a course of studies at Collège de la Trinité, Lyon. 1660s.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Israel’s War of Independence and the Early Days of the IDF. 58 photographs presented to Israel Ber, IDF officer and later convicted spy.
    <b>19th Century Shop’s Catalog 170 Great Books and Photos. Please inquire for a copy.</b>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Early Unpublished Darwin letter on the races of man. Autograph Letter Signed [to Henry Denny]. Down, Kent, June 1, [1844].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Classic Image of American Slavery. Kimball, M. H. <i>Emancipated Slaves</i>. New York: George Hanks, 1863.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> (Underground Railroad.) Scaggs, Isaac. Important Runaway Slave Poster: $500 Reward Ran away, or decoyed from the subscriber…
  • <b>Results from Bonhams’ sale of <i>Fine Books & Manuscripts Featuring Exploration and Travel</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Columbus. De Insulis nuper in mari Indico repertis. Basel, 1494. SOLD for $751,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cook in Tahiti. [Playbill]. [Germany, c.1840.] SOLD for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Aa, Pieter van der. Naaukeurige versameling der gedenk-waardigste zee en land-reysen. Leyden, 1706-8. SOLD for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Dürer. Underweysung der messung [and two more]. Nuremberg, 1525-8. SOLD for $175,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 26:</b> Cortes, Hernan. A Pleito signed by Antonio de Mendoza in the case of Hernan Cortes. 1542. SOLD for $8750
    <b>Results from Bonhams’ <i>The Air and Space Sale</i></b>
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Russian Kholod 5D67 HFL Rocket Engine. SOLD for $25,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Neil Armstrong Apollo Era Training Glove. SOLD for $50,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Full Scale Sputnik-1 EMC/EMI Lab Model. SOLD for $847,500
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> SOLRAD GREB Spy Satellite Engineering Dummy. SOLD for $10,000
    <b>Bonhams, Sep. 27:</b> Soviet LK-3 Lunar Lander Model. SOLD for $25,000
  • <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Redouté, Pierre Joseph, and Claude Antoine Thory. <i>Les Roses</I>. Paris: Firmin Didot, 1817–1824. Est. $225,000 to $325,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Jakob Christoph. <i>Hortus Nitidissimis Omnen Per Annum Superbiens Floribus</i>… Nuremberg: Johann Joseph Fleischmann, 1750 [–1786]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Trew, Christoph Jakob, and Benedict Christian Vogel. <i>Plantæ Selectæ</i>…[Nuremberg:] 1750–1773; Supplement, [Augsburg:] 1790 [–1792]. Est. $200,000 to $300,000
    <b>Sotheby’s New York: The Magnificent Botanical Library of D. F. Allen. October 26, 2017</b>
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Jacquin, Nikolaus Joseph von. <i>Plantarum Rariorum Horti Caesarei Schönbrunnensis Descriptiones Et Icones.</i>Vienna; London; Leiden, 1797–1804. Est. $180,000 to $250,000
    <b>Sotheby’s NY, Oct. 26:</b> Weinmann, Johann Wilhelm. <i>Phytanthoza Iconographia; Sive Conspectus Aliquot Millium, Tam Indigenarum Quam Exoticarum</i>… Regensburg, 1735–1737–1745. Est. $120,000 to $180,000

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